Meltdown: The Predictable Distortion of Global Warming by Scientists, Politicians, and the Media

By Patrick J. Michaels | Go to book overview

Afterword
Composite Campaign Speech
on Global Warming

On October 30, 2003, for the first time ever, the U.S. Senate voted on a bill, S. 139, to restrict our energy use to slow global warming. Sponsored by John McCain (R-Ariz.) and Joseph Lieberman (DConn.), it went on to defeat, 55–43.

The narrow margin of defeat for S. 139 guarantees three things: global warming is politically hot, President Bush's environmental record will be an important part of the 2004 campaign for his defeat, and S. 139 will never go away. On Halloween 2003, McCain vowed to reintroduce the bill in 2004, promising a year-over-year fight until it passes, just as he did with his “Campaign Finance Reform” legislation.

In preparation for the vote on S. 139, and for years previous, McCain and others concerned about global warming assembled a written record in numerous House and Senate hearings on the subject, and in other venues. So much so, that a pretty decent campaign speech could be constructed by merely concatenating the recorded wisdom of our Solons on the subject of global warming. Think of the following as a generic campaign speech in the 2004 election cycle. (Each of the following statements is a direct quote from the sources noted.)

Global warming is a serious threat. There is overwhelming evidence that increasing amounts of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases are heating up the earth's climate and that inaction could be disastrous (1).

President Bush speaks of an axis of terror, but there is another axis of evil in the world: poverty and ignorance, disease and environmental disorder (2). The Bush Administration ignores the terror of environmental peril and denies the reality of 2,500 United Nations scientists who tell us that unless we find ways to stop global warming, sea levels could swell up to 35 feet, submerging millions of homes under our present day oceans (3). The crisis in climate change

-243-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Meltdown: The Predictable Distortion of Global Warming by Scientists, Politicians, and the Media
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents *
  • Epigraph vii
  • 1 - Foreword 1
  • 2 - An Introduction to Global Warming 9
  • 3 - Meltdown? the Truth About Icecaps 33
  • 4 - All Creatures Cute and Furry 73
  • 5 - Spin Cycle: Hurricanes, Tornadoes, and Other Cyclones 111
  • 6 - Droughts and Floods: Worse and Worse? 127
  • 7 - A Greener World of Changing Seasons? 163
  • 8 - Global Warming, Disease, and Death 179
  • 9 - No Fact Checks, Please! 195
  • 10 - The “national Assessment” Disaster 207
  • 11 - The Predictable Distortion of Global Warming 221
  • 12 - Breaking the Cycle 237
  • Afterword - Composite Campaign Speech on Global Warming 243
  • References 249
  • Index 255
  • Cato Institute *
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 271

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.