Meltdown: The Predictable Distortion of Global Warming by Scientists, Politicians, and the Media

By Patrick J. Michaels | Go to book overview

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Meltdown: The Predictable Distortion of Global Warming by Scientists, Politicians, and the Media
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents *
  • Epigraph vii
  • 1 - Foreword 1
  • 2 - An Introduction to Global Warming 9
  • 3 - Meltdown? the Truth About Icecaps 33
  • 4 - All Creatures Cute and Furry 73
  • 5 - Spin Cycle: Hurricanes, Tornadoes, and Other Cyclones 111
  • 6 - Droughts and Floods: Worse and Worse? 127
  • 7 - A Greener World of Changing Seasons? 163
  • 8 - Global Warming, Disease, and Death 179
  • 9 - No Fact Checks, Please! 195
  • 10 - The “national Assessment” Disaster 207
  • 11 - The Predictable Distortion of Global Warming 221
  • 12 - Breaking the Cycle 237
  • Afterword - Composite Campaign Speech on Global Warming 243
  • References 249
  • Index 255
  • Cato Institute *
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