Russians on Russian Music, 1880-1917: An Anthology

By Stuart Campbell | Go to book overview

CHAPTER FIVE
Moscow and her composers

(a) N. D. Kashkin: The Moscow School in Music. An Essay by Prof. N. D. Kashkin. New Word, June 1910, no. 6, pp. 53–8

This greatly curtailed essay outlines a general picture, some aspects of which are examined in later articles.

In the luxuriant flowering which Russian music has achieved at present, seniority and initiative belong to St Petersburg. It was in St Petersburg that Glinka and his immediate successors lived and worked, and it was there too that the first Russian Conservatoire was opened just when some of the St Petersburg intelligentsia were begetting the group of musicians who called themselves the 'young Russian school' but who had the comic nickname the 'Mighty Handful' as well. In regard to music, Moscow emerged independently much later, and the origins of the Moscow school may be dated to the opening of the Moscow Conservatoire, whose first teachers of music theory were P. I. Tchaikovsky and G. A. Laroche – who had both previously completed the course at the St Petersburg Conservatoire.

The group of Moscow composers is very large and active at present, but we do not count all its members among the Moscow school; thus, for instance, A. T. Grechaninov1 and M. M. Ippolitov-Ivanov2 live and continue their activities in Moscow, but both are alumni of the St Petersburg Conservatoire, although the former is indebted for a significant part of his musical education to Moscow and its Conservatoire.

We intend, first of all, to define what, in our view, should be called the Moscow school.

Tchaikovsky began his career both as composer and teacher in Moscow in 1866. To his teaching he brought the same clear-headedness of view which guided his compositional work too. Without being a theorist in either

____________________
1
Grechaninov: see Chapter 4, article (d), n. 22.
2
M. M. Ippolitov-Ivanov (1859 – 1935): composer and conductor; pupil of Rimsky-Korsakov. In Georgia, 1882 – 93, director of Moscow Conservatoire, 1905 – 22.

-168-

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Russians on Russian Music, 1880-1917: An Anthology
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • Introduction xi
  • Sources xv
  • Chapter One - Tchaikovsky 1
  • Chapter Two - Rimsky-Korsakov 42
  • Chapter Three - Other Composers of the Former Balakirev Circle 92
  • Chapter Four - The Belyayev Generation 132
  • Chapter Five - Moscow and Her Composers 168
  • Chapter Six - New Stylistic Directions 198
  • Epilogue 234
  • Index 259
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