The Matter of Revolution: Science, Poetry, and Politics in the Age of Milton

By John Rogers | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

The research for this book has been supported by many generous sources, including a Whiting Fellowship in the Humanities, a John F. Enders Research Assistance Grant, and an A. Whitney Griswold Faculty Research Fellowship, all administered by Yale University. I am grateful for the assistance afforded by a Short-Term Fellowship at the William Andrews Clark Memorial Library, an American Council of Learned Societies Grant-in-Aid, a W. M. Keck Foundation Fellowship at the Huntington Library, and especially an Eccles Fellowship at the Humanities Center at the University of Utah and a Mellon Fellowship at the Society of Fellows in the Humanities at Columbia University.

I want to acknowledge my appreciation for the encouragement, the scholarly advice, and the diverse intellectual examples provided by John Hollander and John Guillory. I am thankful for the help from Richard Burt, Victoria Kahn, David Quint, Barry Weller, Jonathan Post, and especially Kevin Dunn; each of them read the entire manuscript, at various stages of completion, and offered incisive and fruitful suggestions. Among those who have given useful assistance with the earliest versions of the material here, I must single out George deF. Lord, Leslie Brisman, Claude Rawson, Susanne Wofford, Cristina Malcolmson, William Clark, Jason Rosenblatt, John King, Karen Lawrence, Donald Friedman, Peter Goldstein, Nicholas von Maltzahn, Heather Dubrow, and Barbara Estrin. The members of the Northeast Milton Seminar, the Works in Progress group at Yale, and the participants in a colloquium at the University of Utah Humanities Center challenged me to change and develop chapters 1 and 4. For some timely advice on seventeenth-century English philosophy, I am indebted to Marilyn Pearsall. I wish

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