A Culture of Teaching: Early Modern Humanism in Theory and Practice

By Rebecca W. Bushnell | Go to book overview

NOTE ON TEXT AND TRANSLATIONS

In the interest of readability, I have modernized the spelling, but not the punctuation, in citations from early modern English works. Throughout, however, I have reproduced the original spelling of these works' titles to assist those readers who would like to use my citations as bibliographical references (Shakespearean titles are the only exceptions). I have translated materials from foreign languages (including James VI's "Scottish"), but I have cited the original texts where I thought it relevant, either in the body of the text or in the notes. Translations are my own except where I have indicated otherwise. Dates of texts included in parentheses after a title refer to the accepted date of the first publication of a work.

My use of masculine pronouns to refer to early modern teachers and students in general is intentional, insofar as the pedagogical culture I discuss assumed that teachers and students would be male, except when specifically noted to be otherwise in discussions of the education of women.

-xiii-

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A Culture of Teaching: Early Modern Humanism in Theory and Practice
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Illustrations ix
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • Note on Text and Translations xiii
  • Prologue the Trials of Humanism 1
  • Chapter 1 - Introduction: Humanism Reconsidered 10
  • Chapter 2 - The Sovereign Master and the Scholar Prince 23
  • Chapter 3 - Cultivating the Mind 73
  • Chapter 4 - Harvesting Books 117
  • Chapter 5 - Tradition and Sovereignty 144
  • Epilogue Contemporary Humanist Pedagogy 185
  • Index 203
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