Going Public: Women and Publishing in Early Modern France

By Dena Goodman; Elizabeth C. Goldsmith | Go to book overview

12
Publishing without Perishing:
Isabelle de Charrière,
a.k.a. la mouche du coche

SUSAN K. JACKSON

Since Habermas, the eighteenth century has been considered decisive in the coming into being, self-consciousness, and influence of a bourgeois public sphere—essentially discursive, increasingly political, but always distinct from the inner sanctums of public office holding. As a result, eighteenth-century literary studies have extended their focus on the production and meaning of texts to include publication and reception. It has become important to ascertain how texts were edited, censored, printed, distributed, and debated. In such efforts to reconstruct the public life of literature lies a further potential for acknowledging that the conditions of publication to which eighteenth-century authors were subject also conditioned and fired their imaginations. An unprecedented number of literary works not only documented the real life of publication, but fantasized about it. By reading those works, we can recognize that the discursive public, like other facts of history and biography, was experienced, embraced, internalized, and reinvented to varying degrees and to various effect by individual authors. Fiction excels at accommodating nuance and idiosyncrasy. Where better to appreciate that, just as unprecedented access to print culture shaped those who participated in it, so did these participants dream of putting their personal stamp on the culture's further evolution? For some, there was a profound sense of self and purpose to be derived from the incessant interplay between facts and fictions of publication.

The case I make here for factoring the discursive public into literary readings centers on a novel, Lettres de Mistriss Henley publiées par son amie, by an accomplished and prolific writer, Isabelle de Charrière ( 1740-1805), whom many readers will nonetheless have encountered, if at all, only as

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Going Public: Women and Publishing in Early Modern France
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 249

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.