Going Public: Women and Publishing in Early Modern France

By Dena Goodman; Elizabeth C. Goldsmith | Go to book overview

Reading Women Writing
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Greatness Engendered: George Eliot and Virginia Woolf
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Talking Back: Toward a Latin American Feminist Literary Criticism
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Articulate Silences: Hisaye Yamamoto, Maxine Hong Kingston, Joy Kogawa
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H.D.'s Freudian Poetics: Psychoanalysis in Translation
by Dianne Chisholm
From Mastery to Analysis: Theories of Gender in Psychoanalytic Feminism
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Feminist Theory, Women's Writing
by Laurie A. Finke
Colette and the Fantom Subject of Autobiography
by Jerry Aline Flieger
Autobiographics: A Feminist Theory of Women's Self-Representation
by Leigh Gilmore
Going Public: Women and Publishing in Early Modern France
edited by Elizabeth C. Goldsmith and Dena Goodman
Cartesian Women: Versions and Subversions of Rational Discourse in the Old Regime
by Erica Harth
Borderwork: Feminist Engagements with Comparative Literature
edited by Margaret R. Higonnet
Narrative Transvestism: Rhetoric and Gender in the Eighteenth-Century English Novel
by Madeleine Kahn
The Unspeakable Mother: Forbidden Discourse in Jean Rhys and H.D.
by Deborah Kelly Kloepfer
Recasting Autobiography: Women's Counterfictions in Contemporary German Literature and Film
by Barbara Kosta
Women and Romance: The Consolations of Gender in the English Novel
by Laurie Langbauer
Nobody's Angels: Middle-Class Women and Domestic Ideology in Victorian Culture
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Penelope Voyages: Women and Travel in the British Literary Tradition
by Karen R. Lawrence
Autobiographical Voices: Race, Gender, Self-Portraiture
by Françoise Lionnet
Postcolonial Representations: Women, Literature, Identity
by Françoise Lionnet
Woman and Modernity: The (Life)Styles of Lou Andreas-Salomé
by Biddy Martin
In the Name of Love: Women, Masochism, and the Gothic
by Michelle A. Massé
Outside the Pale: Cultural Exclusion, Gender Difference, and the Victorian Woman Writer
by Elsie B. Michie
Reading Gertrude Stein: Body, Text, Gnosis
by Lisa Ruddick
Conceived by Liberty: Maternal Figures and Nineteenth-Century American Literature
by Stephanie A. Smith
Feminist Conversations: Fuller, Emerson, and the Play of Reading
by Christina Zwarg

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