Ulysses S. Grant: Politician

By William B. Hesseltine | Go to book overview

Chapter V Joining the Radical Church

FOR months before Stanton's suspension, the Northern people had generally agreed that General Grant should be their next President Publicly, the reticent General had said nothing which would commit him to either party. His popularity was undimmed, and politicians eyed with mixed feelings his obvious availability. Only an intimate group knew of Grant's efforts in behalf of radical legislation, and even the Democrats nursed hopes of making the general their standard bearer. To the rank and file of the politicians, Grant was an enigma: to the people he was still a hero.

From the people, and from the lesser politicians, the demand for Grant was insistent. Interpreting correctly the prevailing sentiment, local partisans hastened to clamber aboard the Grant bandwagon, and wrote fulsome and optimistic letters to Congressman Washburne. "We shall elect Grant," said one of them, "and under Grant we shall have economy and reconstruction." Another declared that "the soldiers hold the balance of power and will make the next President. . . . With Grant at the masthead the combined powers of darkness cannot beat us."1

In contrast with the masses of the Republican Party, the Radical leaders did not warm up to the prospect of Grant's candidacy. Horace Greeley in the Tribune was openly scornful of Grant's reticence. "Of what use is it," he asked, "to throw away kegs of butter and barrels of apples, hats and boots, and other magnificent specimens of merchandise and manufacture upon a military man who is so extremely afraid of damaging his chances of the Presidency . . . that he never permits himself to go beyond the polite vagueness of 'much obliged'? When . . . is a man to express his opinions . . . if it be not when . . . his stomach is filled with eleemosynary dainties?"2

Other Republican leaders shared Greeley's disgust for the noncommittal general. In the spring of 1867, Ben Wade went to JesseGrant

____________________
1
E. A. Small, (Galena) January 3, 1867, and J. L. Camp, (Dixon, Ill.) January 27, 1867, to Washburne, Washburne MSS.
2
New York Tribune, March 17, 1867.

-89-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Ulysses S. Grant: Politician
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 484

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.