The History of the Reign of King Henry the Seventh

By Francis Bacon | Go to book overview

NOTE ON THE TEXT AND SOURCES

The text presented here is based on James Spedding's authoritative edition of 1861. Spedding derived his text from the manuscript in the British Museum (Add. ms 7084 Plut. CXXIV. D.) and the first edition of 1622, printed by W. Stansby for Mathew Lownes and William Barret. To check Spedding's accuracy and judgment, I compared his text, line by line, with both the manuscript and the 1622 edition, the only edition to appear during Bacon's life. Spedding rightly chose to use the manuscript as the ultimate authority, in most cases and whenever possible. For although the manuscript is not in Bacon's hand, many of its corrections are, and clearly he went over it very carefully. We can only assume that Bacon intervened and made corrections in the course of producing the first printed edition.

Spedding for the most part used paragraph divisions as they appear in the manuscript. He followed the spirit if not the form of its punctuation and modernized the spelling. My examination of the three texts reveals Spedding to have been careful and sober in his judgment. I have noted the few instances in which he did not indicate, in the case of a discrepancy, that he has followed the manuscript or the 1622 edition. The manuscript has three small sets of missing leaves, which I have identified in the footnotes. The 1622 edition is remarkably faithful to the manuscript; discrepancies, when they occur, range from the trivial to the minor and in no case lead to any problem of meaning. When discrepancies are more than merely trivial, I have noted them. In addition to comparing the original English texts, I also compared them, again retracing Spedding's steps, to the Latin translation, which

-19-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The History of the Reign of King Henry the Seventh
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Introduction 1
  • Note on the Text and Sources 19
  • Note on the Annotation 21
  • The History of the Reign of King Henry the Seventh 23
  • Interpretive Essay 213
  • Index 253
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 262

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.