Perspectives on Thinking, Learning, and Cognitive Styles

By Robert J. Sternberg; Li-Fang Zhang | Go to book overview

conducted. First, we need to go beyond cross-sectional studies. That is, longitudinal studies are required to capture the socialization process of people's thinking styles. Second, we need to go beyond quantitative investigations. That is, much qualitative work needs to be done. A true understanding of a theoretical construct requires both quantification and a deep understanding of what goes through people's minds.


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