Perspectives on Thinking, Learning, and Cognitive Styles

By Robert J. Sternberg; Li-Fang Zhang | Go to book overview

people improve their learning and designing better processes in education and development. For those with an interest in learning organizations, it provides a theory and assessment methods for the study of individual differences while addressing learning at many levels in organizations and society.


References

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Boyatzis, R. E., Cowen, S. S., & Kolb, D. A. (Eds.). (1995). Innovation in professional education: Steps in a journey from teaching to learning. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

Boyatzis, R. E., & Kolb, D. A. (1991). Learning Skills Profile. (Available from TRG Hay/McBer, Training Resources Group, 116 Huntington Avenue, Boston, MA 02116, trg_mcber@haygroup.com)

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