Time and Intimacy: A New Science of Personal Relationships

By Joel B. Bennett | Go to book overview

Appendix:
Integrating the Research Reflections
The above version of Fig. 9.1 suggests that each of the measures described in the 18 RESEARCH REFLECTIONS (RR) may be used to investigate the ideas put forward in this book. As can be seen in the figure, not every idea has a corresponding measure. I offer these questions to help stimulate further exploration.
How does interpersonal intimacy (RR # 1) overlap with intrapersonal (3, 4, 5) and transpersonal (6) intimacy? Do partners differ in how they balance these as suggested by the self-rating scale in chapter 2 (see p. 81)?
Does the capacity for being in the moment (presence, RR # 5) with a partner influence how much one hides family secrets or scripts (15)? Do these also influence the kinds of stories partners tell (12) about their relationship?
Can couples be identified by whether they tend to be oriented toward nurturing conditions (7) versus form (8) or chaos (9)?
Is it possible to use the different measures to explore the process of calibration within a couple? For example, do differences in morningness-eveningness (10) influence routine maintenance (17), or other communication processes (e.g., communication apprehension-14, regulation-18)? How do these processes, along with the resources partners exchange during the day (16), influence the stories (12) and metaphors (2) they use to describe their relationship?
How are the above processes influenced by attachment style (11) or relationship with God (6)? For example, do insecurely attached partners structure their time (8) differently? Does having a partner with a more secure view of God change this?

-311-

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