Evolving Practices in Human Resource Management: Responses to a Changing World of Work

By Allen I. Kraut; Abraham K. Korman | Go to book overview
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surveys to align with those business strategies. Both the topics in surveys and the use of the data have gone beyond measuring morale to helping achieve the business strategies.

These more recent goals for the role of surveys are facilitated by electronic technology and improved computing, which allow more and better focused surveys. At the same time, they put a higher premium on the skills of the survey researchers to conduct sound surveys as well as to mobilize organizational resources and energy to make effective use of the survey data. Those survey practitioners who can rise to this challenge and adapt as they move forward will greatly help their organizations to succeed.


References

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Bringing Sears into the new world. (1997, Oct. 13). Fortune, p. 184.

Burke, W. W. (1994). Diagnostic models for organizational change. In A. Howard & Associates (Eds.), Diagnosis for organizational change. New York: Guilford Press.

Carsten, J. M., & Spector, P. E. (1987). Unemployment, job satisfaction, and employee turnover: A meta-analytic test of the Muchinsky model. Journal of Applied Psychology, 73, 374–381.

Fuller, W. L. (1997, Apr.). Spreading the word through wide area networked data access tools. In K. Paul (Chair), Survey techniques at work. Paper presented at the Twelfth Annual Conference of the Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology, St. Louis, MO.

Getman, J. G., Goldberg, S. B., & Herman, J. B. (1976). Union representation elections: Law and reality. New York: Russell Sage Foundation.

Hamner, W. C., & Smith, F. J. (1978). Work attitudes as predictors of unionization activity. Journal of Applied Psychology, 63 (4), 415–421.

Hansen, G. S., & Wernerfelt, B. (1989). Determinants of firm performance: The relative importance of economic and organizational factors. Strategic Management Journal, 10, 399–411.

Heskett, J. L., Sasser, W. E., & Schlesinger, L. A. (1997). The service profit chain: How leading companies link profit and growth to loyalty, satisfaction, and value. New York: Free Press.

Heskett, J. L., and others. (1994, Mar.–Apr.). Putting the service profit chain to work. Harvard Business Review, pp. 164–174.

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