The Cambridge Companion to Martin Luther

By Donald K. McKim | Go to book overview

Chronology of Martin Luther

1483 Born November 10, in Eisleben, Germany

1501 Enters University of Erfurt to study liberal arts

1502 Receives Baccalaureate degree

1505 Receives Master's degree and makes decision to enter monastery

1506 Ordination and monastic vows as Augustinian monk

1509 Receives Bachelor of Theology degree

1511 Transfer to Wittenberg

1512 Receives Doctor of Theology degree in Wittenberg

1513 Begins first set of lectures on the Psalms

1515 Lectures on Romans

1516 Lectures on Galatians

1517 Postingof Ninety-five Theses in Wittenberg

1518 HeidelbergDisputation and initial trial at Rome

1519 LeipzigDebate with Johannes Eck

1520 Publishes The Babylonian Captivity of the Church and burns Papal Bull of excommunication

1521 Diet of Worms and seclusion at Wartburg

1522 Returns to Wittenbergand New Testament translation in German appears

1524 Writings on the Lord's Supper against Karlstadt

1525 Writes against Peasants; publishes Bondage of the Will

1525 Marries Katharina von Bora

1529 Small Catechism published; attends MarburgColloquy

1530 Presentation of the Augsburg Confession

1534 Publication of the complete German Bible

1535 Lectures on Genesis begin and continue to 1545

1536 Formulates the Schmalkald Articles

1537 Serious illness

1538 Writes On the Councils and the Church

1543 Publishes On the Jews and Their Lies

1546 Dies at Eisleben on February 18; buried in the Castle Church in Wittenberg

-xvii-

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