African Literature, Animism and Politics

By Caroline Rooney | Go to book overview

Acknowledgements

I am grateful to the editors of the Oxford Literary Review for permission to reprint 'Clandestine Antigones'. It first appeared in the Oxford Literary Review, vol. 19, 1997. I am also grateful to Ama Ata Aidoo and Dangaroo Press for permission to reprint excerpts from Ama Ata Aidoo's 'Loving the Black Angel' and 'Images of Africa at Century's End', both from An Angry Letter in January. My thanks to Stephen Gray for permission to reprint an excerpt from his translation of Wilma Stockenström's 'On the Suicide of Young Writers'. Although I have made every effort to locate copyright holders, I have failed to establish contact in a few cases, and offer my apologies.

I am grateful to the University of Kent for a sabbatical term during which most of this book was written. I would like to offer warm thanks to my colleagues at the Centre for Colonial and Postcolonial Studies at Kent, Rod Edmond, Abdulrazak Gurnah and Lyn Innes, for their support and encouragement, and for setting many admirable precedents. More widely, this book has benefited from intellectual engagements with many colleagues, students and friends, and I wish to thank the following for the stimulation of ongoing exchanges: Maggie Awadalla, David Ayers, Glenn Bowman, Elizabeth Cowie, David Cummings, Rana Dayoub, Grace Ebron, Derek Matyszak, Andréa Mercier, Jan Montefiore, Wendy Shorter and Anastasia Valassopoulos. For useful responses to the project in its early stages, I am grateful to Benita Parry and Ato Quayson, without wishing to oblige their approval of what has emerged. I am further grateful to Angela Smith for her careful reading of a penultimate draft of the manuscript and for her valuable advice. I have benefited from the interest and expertise of my editors at Routledge, Craig Fowlie and Milon Nagi. I thank them for their help and, more widely, thank the staff at Routledge for their support. I would also like to express my gratitude to Ayman al-Kharrat for the generosity of his expertise in taking the photograph for the cover. This book has taken shape as one of a number of possible projects over the years. I am deeply appreciative of the following for their thought-provoking influence on my work, their helpful suggestions, and for standing by: Timothy Clark, Victoria Mavros, Forbes Morlock, Felicity Rooney, Maurice Rooney, Nicholas Royle and Nancy Winfield. Finally, I wish to thank Julia Borossa for her astute readings of the work at various stages and for being such an inspiring and sustaining co-traveller.

-viii-

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African Literature, Animism and Politics
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgements viii
  • Introduction 1
  • 1 - Clandestine Antigones and the Pre-Post-Colonial 31
  • 2 - From Hegel on Africa Towards a Reading of African Literature 154
  • Notes 228
  • Index 241
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