African Literature, Animism and Politics

By Caroline Rooney | Go to book overview

Notes

Introduction

1
Aristotle, Physics, in The Basic Works of Aristotle, ed. and introd. Richard McKeon (New York: Random House, 1941), p. 291.
2
Bessie Head, A Question of Power (London: Heinemann, 1974), pp. 21-2.
3
Thomas Mofolo, Chaka, trans. Daniel P. Kunene (Oxford: Heinemann, 1981) pp. 21-2.
4
Head, A Question of Power, p. 22. The following analysis extends from the passage first cited.
5
See, for example, Elizabeth Evasdaughter, 'Bessie Head's A Question of Power read as a Mariner's Guide to Paranoia', in Research in African Literatures, 20 (Spring 1989), 72-83. Various readings of A Question of Power, including one of my own, are to be found in Motherlands, ed. Susheila Nasta (London: Women's Press, 1991).
6
Head, A Question of Power, p. 35.
7
Jacqueline Rose, 'On the "Universality" of Madness: Bessie Head's A Question ofPower', in Critical Inquiry, 20 (Spring 1994), 401-18.
8
Bessie Head, A Gesture of Belonging: Letters from Bessie Head, 1965-1979, ed. Randolph Vigne (London: SA Writers, 1991), p.154.
9
As cited by M.J. Daymond, Introduction, Bessie Head, The Cardinals: With Meditations and Short Stories (Cape Town: David Philip, 1993), p. vxii.
10
Enrico Coen, The Art of Genes: How Organisms Make Themselves (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1999), p. 362.
11
Aristotle, Physics 220a-b, pp. 293-4.
12
Jacques Derrida, Margins of Philosophy, trans. Alan Bass (Chicago: Chicago University Press, 1982), 29-68. For a further critique of the philosophical concept of time, see Brian Dillon, 'The Temporality of Rhetoric: The Spatialisation of Time in Modern Criticism', PhD (Kent, 1999).
13
Head, A Question of Power, p. 201.
14
Mofolo, Chaka, p. 153.
15
Head, A Question of Power, p. 31.
16
Paulin Hountondji, African Philosophy: Myth and Reality, trans. Henri Evans with Jonathan Rée, introd. Abiola Irele (Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1983), p.64.
17
Jacques Derrida, 'The Time of a Thesis', as cited in: Nicholas Royle, Telepathy and Literature: Essays on the Reading Mind (Oxford: Basil Blackwell, 1991), p. 1.
18
Lucien Lévy-Bruhl, How Natives Think, introd. Ruth L. Bunzel, trans. Lilian A. Clare (New York: Washington Square Press, 1966), p. 7. In French, the work is: Fonctions Mentales dans les Societés Inférieures (1910).
19
Lévy-Bruhl, How Natives Think, p. 323.
20
Lévy-Bruhl, How Natives Think, p. 333.
21
Irele, Introduction, African Philosophy, p. 13.

-228-

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African Literature, Animism and Politics
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgements viii
  • Introduction 1
  • 1 - Clandestine Antigones and the Pre-Post-Colonial 31
  • 2 - From Hegel on Africa Towards a Reading of African Literature 154
  • Notes 228
  • Index 241
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