Meaning in Spinoza's Method

By Aaron V. Garrett | Go to book overview

Texts and editions

All English translations of Spinoza's Ethics are my own except when noted. Some are taken from Edwin Curley (ed. and trans.), The Collected Works of Spinoza (Princeton University Press, 1985). Translations from Curley's Ethics will be abbreviated as CW, and this abbreviation will also be used when I make reference to his editorial apparatus and commentary. Curley's translations are far superior to mine, but I have relied on my clumsier translations to get across some of the technical oddities in Spinoza's Latin. All passages cited from the Principia Philosophia Cartesianae, the Tractatus de Intellectus Emendatione, and the Korte Verhandeling are from Curley's edition, and Curley's translation is used. The abbreviation NS in some of Curley's translations refers to variant readings from the Nagelate Schriften, the Dutch translation of Spinoza's works. Thanks to Princeton University Press for allowing me to cite from Curley's edition. Latin quotes will be referenced to Carl Gebhardt (ed.), Spinoza Opera, 6 vols. (Heidelberg: Carl Winter Verlag, 1925). Although the new French critical edition of Spinoza, Pierre-François Moreau (ed.), Spinoza: Oeuvres (Paris: PUF, 1999–), establishes texts which supersede Gebhardt, the edition references the standard Gebhardt page numbers. I will use the following standard abbreviations throughout: quotes from the Ethics will be simply referenced by part and number (i.e., “IIIP4”). The Tractatus de Intellectus Emendatione will be abbreviated TIE and referenced by paragraph number (i.e., “TIE 99”). Abbreviations employed in the text to refer to Spinoza's other works will be TTP (Tractatus Theologico-Politicus), TP (Tractatus Politicus), PP (Principia Philosophiae Cartesianae), and KV (Korte Verhandeling). All will be referenced by chapter and section numbers and when necessary Gebhardt page (abbreviated by volume and page), except the PP which will be referenced by proposition. Spinoza's letters will be cited in the text as “Letter” followed by a roman numeral number; i.e. Letter 30 will be cited as “Letter XXX.” All translations from Spinoza's letters are from, Abraham Wolf (ed. and trans.), The Correspondence of Spinoza (London: Allen and Unwin, 1928),

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