The Political Economy of Japanese Globalization

By Glenn D. Hook; Hasegawa Harukiyo | Go to book overview

10

Japanese responses to globalization

Nationalism and transnationalism

Hatsuse Ryūhei


Introduction

This chapter examines the Japanese response to globalization with a specific focus on its influence on society since the late 1980s. It is characterized by the emergence of a contradictory tendency of, on the one hand, the resurgence of nationalism and, on the other, the advent of transnationalism. While the literature on nationalism is vast, here it is defined simply as a political principle and its social manifestation which insists on the congruence of the state and nation (Gellner 1983:1). In contrast transnationalism, the legitimacy of which as an academic term is much less established, can be defined as a social principle and its practices supporting human activities beyond nations and across national borders. Inherent in transnationalism is universalism - namely, the principle that all human beings are born equal irrespective of nationality, race, creed, family origin or perhaps even sex. It is associated with cosmopolitanism in that anyone can live and enjoy safety anywhere in the world, and everybody has the right to choose freely their place of abode, whether in the country of birth or elsewhere.

Nationalism can be further subdivided into moderate nationalism and ultranationalism. What this means for our discussion is that the Japanese response to globalization can be transnationalism or either variant of nationalism. The concept of acculturation can facilitate differentiating amongst these three, as national feelings or nationalism in the non-West are closely related with the acculturation of each nation facing Western influences (Hirano 2000:145). Extending this argument further, a transnational or moderately national response to globalization can be understood as adaptive acculturation in the face of global or universal influences. In contrast, ultranationalism can be understood as an adverse reaction to this sort of transnationalism as well as outside influences in general.

In so far as universalism, cosmopolitanism and transnationalism are concerned, the salient feature of contemporary Japan in the face of globalization is the increasing legitimacy of these principles. As will be argued later, this can be seen in the efforts made to enhance the human rights of foreigners in Japan, whether 'old-comers', such as resident Koreans and Chinese, or 'newcomers', such as migrant workers from Asia and other parts of the world. What this means is that, whereas Japan has been known as a society closed to

-173-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Political Economy of Japanese Globalization
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 236

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.