The Political Economy of Corruption

By Arvind K. Jain | Go to book overview

state of the discussion does not allow much specificity as to what any new conceptions of corruption might be like - much less, as to the outlines of the systems within which they become meaningful. At the very least, however, speculating about them helps put our current definitions in a useful perspective. It suggests that the search for definitions is doomed to failure if its goal is a completely precise, universally-applicable rule for classifying behavior as corrupt. On the other hand, a view of corruption as a political as well as analytical concept - one reflecting clashing interests as much as conceptions of public morality - can yield concepts that are much less neat, but are more useful for comparative analysis and for the understanding of change.


Notes
1
I am indebted to Dennis Thompson for his comments on this point.
2
In a more recent book Thompson (1995) elaborated upon this concept, and changed the term to "institutional corruption."
3
I thank Dr. Salvador Valdes-Prieto, Centro de Estudios Publicos in Santiago, Chile, for his comments on this point.

Bibliography

a
Aristotle (1962 edn) The Politics (trans. E. Barker), New York: Oxford University Press.

b
Berg, L. L., Hahn, H., and Schmidhauser, J. R. (1976) Corruption in theAmerican Political System, Morristown, NJ: General Learning.

c
Carbonell-Catilo, A. (1985) "The Dynamics of Manipulation and Violence in Philippine Elections: A Case of Political Corruption," 13th World Congress, International Political Science Association, Paris.

d
Dobel, J. P. (1978) "The Corruption of a State," American Political ScienceReview 72: 958-73.
Dolan, K., McKeown, B., and Carlson, J. M. (1988) "Popular Conceptions of Political Corruption: Implications for the Empirical Study of Political Ethics," Corruption and Reform 3: 3-24.

e
Euben, J. P. (1978) "On Political Corruption," Antioch Review 36: 103-18.

f
Friedrich, C. J. (1966) "Political Pathology," Political Quarterly 37: 70-85.
--(1974) Limited Government: A Comparison, Englewood Cliffs, NJ: PrenticeHall.

g
Gerth, H. H. and Mills, C. W. (1946) From Max Weber: Essays in Sociology, New York: Oxford University Press.
Gibbons, K. M. (1989) "Toward an Attitudinal Definition of Corruption," in A. Heidenheimer, M. Johnston, and V. LeVine, Political Corruption: A Handbook, New Brunswick, NJ: Transaction, 165-71.
Gorta, A. and Forell, S. (1995) "Layers of Decision: Linking Social Definitions of Corruption and Willingness to Take Action," Crime, Law, and SocialChange 23: 315-43.

h
Heidenheimer, A. J. (1989a) "Perspectives on the Perception of Corruption," in A. Heidenheimer, M. Johnston, and V. LeVine, Political Corruption: AHandbook, New Brunswick, NJ: Transaction.

-29-

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