Ill Effects: The Media/Violence Debate

By Martin Barker; Julian Petley | Go to book overview

REFERENCES

b
Barker, M. (1984), A Haunt of Fears: the strange history of the British horror comics campaign, London: Pluto Press.
Belson, W. (1978), Television Violence and the Adolescent Boy, Farnborough: Saxon House.
Bragg, S. and J. Grahame (1997), 'An Interview with James Ferman of the BBFC', The English and Media Magazine36:33-36.
British Board of Film Classification (1995), Annual Report for 1994/5, London: British Board of Film Classification.
Britzman, D.P. (1998), Lost Subjects, Contested Objects: Toward a Psychoanalytic Inquiry of Learning, New York: SUNY.
Brophy, P. (1986), 'Horrality-the textuality of contemporary horror films', Screen,27:1, Jan.-Feb., pp. 2-13.
Bryant, J. and D. Anderson, eds (1983), Children's Understanding of Television, New York: Academic Press.
Buckingham, D. (1986), 'Against Demystification', Screen,27:5, September-October.
Buckingham, D. (1990), Watching Media Learning: Making Sense of Media Education, London: Falmer Press.
Buckingham, D. (1993), Changing Literacies: Media Education and Modern Culture, London: Institute of Education/Tufnell Press.
Buckingham, D. (1993), Children Talking Television: the making of television literacy, London: Falmer Press.
Buckingham, D. (1996), Moving Images: Understanding Children's Emotional Response to TV, Manchester and New York: Manchester University Press.
Buckingham, D., J. Grahame, and Michael Morgan (1995), Making Media: Practical Production in Media Education, London: The English and Media Centre.
Buckingham, D. and J. Sefton-Green (1994), Cultural Studies Goes to School, London: Taylor and Francis.

c
Cameron, D. (1996), 'Wanted: the female serial killer.' Trouble and Strife,33: Summer, pp. 21-8.
Cameron, D. (1996/7), 'Motives and meanings.' Trouble and Strife,34: Winter, pp. 44-52.
Cameron, D. and E. Frazer (1987), The Lust to Kill: A Feminist Investigation of Sexual Murder, Cambridge: Polity Press.
Center for Media Literacy (1995), Beyond Blame: Challenging Violence in the Media (teaching pack with 5 guides and videos), Los Angeles USA: Center for Media Literacy.
Cherland, M.R. (1994), Private Practices: Girls Reading Fiction and Constructing Identity, London: Taylor and Francis.
Clover, C. (1992), Men, Women and Chainsaws: Gender in the Modern Horror Film, London: BFI.
Cohen, P. (1991), Monstrous Images, Perverse Reasons: Cultural Studies in Anti-racist Education (Working Paper no. 11), London: Centre for Multi-cultural Education, Institute of Education, University of London.
Considine, D. (1995), 'Are we there yet? An update on the media literacy movement', Educational Technology,35:4, pp. 32-43.

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Ill Effects: The Media/Violence Debate
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Introduction 1
  • References 25
  • 1 - The Newson Report 27
  • 2 - The Worrying Influence of 'Media Effects' Studies 47
  • Notes 60
  • 3 - Electronic Child Abuse? 63
  • Notes 76
  • 4 - Living for Libido; Or, 'Child's Play Iv' 78
  • 5 - Just What the Doctors Ordered? 87
  • References 108
  • 6 - Once More with Feeling 111
  • References 125
  • 7 - I Was a Teenage Horror Fan 126
  • 8 - 'Looks like It Hurts' 135
  • 9 - Reservoirs of Dogma 150
  • 10 - Us and Them 170
  • References 184
  • 11 - Invasion of the Internet Abusers 186
  • 12 - On the Problems of Being a 'trendy Travesty' 202
  • References 224
  • Index 225
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