Ill Effects: The Media/Violence Debate

By Martin Barker; Julian Petley | Go to book overview

and tapes of some programmes are available from this site although, at the time of writing, information about the two programmes referred to had not yet appeared.


REFERENCES
Australian Broadcasting Tribunal (1990), TV Violence in Australia, 4 vols, Canberra: Australian Government Publishing Service.
Bourke, T. (1990), Prisoner: Cell Block H, Behind the Scenes, London: Angus and Robertson.
Cunningham, S. (1992), Framing Culture: Criticism and Policy in Australia, Sydney: Allen and Unwin.
Cunningham, S. and Jacka, L. (1996), Australian Television and International Mediascapes, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Curthoys, A. and Docker, J. (1989), 'In praise of Prisoner' in J. Tulloch and G. Turner (eds) Australian Television: Programs, Pleasures and Politics, Sydney: Allen and Unwin.
Docker, J. and Curthoys, A. (1994), 'Melodrama in action: Prisoner or Cell Block H, in J. Docker, Postmodernism and Popular Culture, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Downing, L. (1999), 'The screaming zone: slasher film spectatorship and the interactive teen audience', Metro (in press).
Huntley, R. (1995), 'Queer cuts: censorship and community', Media International Australia, 78, pp. 5-12.
Mullen, (downloaded October 1996), 'Psychiatric Report: Martin Bryant', http://www.theage.com.au.
Office for Film and Literature Classification (1999), Guidelines for the Classification of Films and Videos (Amendment no. 2), www.oflc.gov.au (downloaded December 7, 1999).
Smith, D. (1995) The Sleep of Reason: The James Bulger Case, London: Arrow Books.
Spurgeon, C. (1994) 'Black white & blue: program classifications for pay TV, Media Information Australia, 72, pp. 55-61.
Stern, L. (1982), 'The Australian cereal: home grown television', in S, Dermody et al., eds, Nellie Melba, Ginger Meggs and Friends, Malmesbury, Victoria: Kibble Books.
Stockwell, S. (1997), 'Panic at the Port', Media International Australia, 85, pp. 56-61.
Turnbull, S. (1995), 'Dying beautifully: crime aesthetics and the media', Australian Journal of Communication, 22:1, pp. 1-13.
Turnbull, S. (1997), 'On looking in the wrong places: Port Arthur and the media violence debate', Australian Quarterly, 69:1, pp. 41-59.
Turnbull, S. (1999), 'Lolita: neither seen nor heard', Metro, 119, pp. 22-7.
Willis, P. (1977), Learning to Labour, Farnborough: Saxon House.
Young, A. (1996), Imagining Crime: Textual Outlaws and Criminal Conversations, London: Sage.

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Ill Effects: The Media/Violence Debate
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Introduction 1
  • References 25
  • 1 - The Newson Report 27
  • 2 - The Worrying Influence of 'Media Effects' Studies 47
  • Notes 60
  • 3 - Electronic Child Abuse? 63
  • Notes 76
  • 4 - Living for Libido; Or, 'Child's Play Iv' 78
  • 5 - Just What the Doctors Ordered? 87
  • References 108
  • 6 - Once More with Feeling 111
  • References 125
  • 7 - I Was a Teenage Horror Fan 126
  • 8 - 'Looks like It Hurts' 135
  • 9 - Reservoirs of Dogma 150
  • 10 - Us and Them 170
  • References 184
  • 11 - Invasion of the Internet Abusers 186
  • 12 - On the Problems of Being a 'trendy Travesty' 202
  • References 224
  • Index 225
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