Social Work and the Courts: A Casebook

By Daniel Pollack | Go to book overview

seen in this case, this is particularly true when a client is in transition from a more to a less restrictive environment. As a result, to successfully realize this goal, the endeavor must be well organized, including the design and implementation of specific techniques germane to this effort (Buchard & Harrington, 1985, 1986).

As treatment efforts are deinstitutionalized, numerous questions are being raised. Is a smaller community-based setting, by definition, a better treatment environment? Are not some large institutions less restrictive than some small settings (Zigler, Hodapp, & Edison, 1990)? Do the large numbers of facilities that exist in the community require the dedication of substantial resources to monitor the quality of treatment? This may be particularly true because many group homes are operated by nonprofessionals. Is the quality of treatment potentially compromised by the often high turnover (as much as 200% in some areas) of the inspectors responsible for the enforcement of treatment standards? Has the anticipated decrease in institutional budgets been realized (Lakin, 1991)? Deinstitutionalization is being scrutinized to determine if it has met societal goals. As part of this ongoing process, social workers play an important role in obtaining and communicating information regarding treatment of persons who have mental retardation.


REFERENCES & READINGS
Brunette, M., & Dean, W. (2002). Community mental health care for women with severe mental illness who are parents. Community Mental Health Journal,38(2), 153-165.
Buchard, J.D., & Harrington, W.A. (1985/86). Deinstitutionalization: Programmed transition from the institution to the community. Child and Family Behavior Therapy,7, 17-34.
Lakin, A. (1991). Deinstitutionalization of the mentally retarded: Big v. little-A national and Florida perspective. Medical Science and the Law,31, 313-321.
Zigler, E., Hodapp, R., & Edison, M. (1990). From theory to practice in the care and education of mentally retarded individuals. American Journal of Mental Retardation,95, 1-12.

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Social Work and the Courts: A Casebook
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Contents ix
  • Issues & Decisions xiii
  • Table of Cases xxiii
  • Acknowledgments xxv
  • Introduction 1
  • How to Use This Book 3
  • References & Readings 6
  • Chapter 1 - Child Welfare 7
  • References & Readings 10
  • References & Readings 19
  • References & Readings 36
  • References & Readings 43
  • References & Readings 50
  • References & Readings 54
  • References & Readings 64
  • References & Readings 68
  • References & Readings 75
  • References & Readings 89
  • References & Readings 92
  • Chapter 2 - Social Worker Liability & Immunity 95
  • References & Readings 97
  • Chapter 3 - Mental Health Issues 113
  • References & Readings 116
  • References & Readings 124
  • References & Readings 132
  • Chapter 4 - Aging 133
  • References & Readings 136
  • References & Readings 145
  • Chapter 5 - Women & the Law 147
  • References & Readings 159
  • Chapter 6 - Income Support 161
  • References & Readings 163
  • References & Readings 171
  • References & Readings 173
  • References & Readings 176
  • References & Readings 179
  • References & Readings 182
  • Chapter 7 - Social Workers in Court 189
  • References & Readings 192
  • Chapter 8 - Social Workers as Employees 199
  • References & Readings 201
  • References & Readings 203
  • Chapter 9 - Public Policy 221
  • References & Readings 229
  • References & Readings 231
  • References & Readings 233
  • Glossary 235
  • Recent Bibliography 245
  • Index 263
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