Social Work and the Courts: A Casebook

By Daniel Pollack | Go to book overview

ciation between poor men and women and might actually lengthen the time an AFDC household would need to receive benefits.

As the number of single-parent families continues to escalate (U.S. House of Representatives, 1992), poverty rates among children have also risen, and the extent of that poverty has also grown worse (Danziger & Danziger, 1993). The Family Support Act, touted as a measure to assist more people off welfare and into the workforce, has not yet shown appreciable success (Edkin & Jencks, 1992). It appears that tinkering with the eligibility criteria of welfare is no longer the political option it once was. Although some social policy experts have advocated reworking the Internal Revenue Code to address institutionalized poverty (Belcher & Fandetti, 1995), a more popular idea has been to limit the length of time recipients may stay on welfare (Halter, 1994). It remains to be seen whether this will increase or decrease the overall poverty rate, especially among children.


REFERENCES & READINGS
Belcher, J., & Fandetti, D. (1995). Welfare entitlements: Addressing the new realities. Social Work,40(4), 515-521.
Danziger, S., & Danziger, S. (1993). Child poverty and public policy: Toward a comprehensive anti-poverty agenda. Daedalus,122(1), 57-85.
Edkin, K., & Jencks, C. (1992). Reforming welfare, In C. Jencks (Ed.), Rethinking social policy (pp. 204-235). Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.
Halter, A. (1994). Chipping away at General Assistance: A matter of economics or an attack on poor people? Social Work,39(6), 705-709.
Lens, V. (2002). Managed care and the judicial system: Another avenue for reform? Health & Social Work,27(1), 27-35.
U.S. House of Representatives, Committee on Ways and Means. (1992). Background materials and data on programs within the jurisdiction of the Committee on Ways and Means (102nd Congress, 2nd session). Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office.

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Social Work and the Courts: A Casebook
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Contents ix
  • Issues & Decisions xiii
  • Table of Cases xxiii
  • Acknowledgments xxv
  • Introduction 1
  • How to Use This Book 3
  • References & Readings 6
  • Chapter 1 - Child Welfare 7
  • References & Readings 10
  • References & Readings 19
  • References & Readings 36
  • References & Readings 43
  • References & Readings 50
  • References & Readings 54
  • References & Readings 64
  • References & Readings 68
  • References & Readings 75
  • References & Readings 89
  • References & Readings 92
  • Chapter 2 - Social Worker Liability & Immunity 95
  • References & Readings 97
  • Chapter 3 - Mental Health Issues 113
  • References & Readings 116
  • References & Readings 124
  • References & Readings 132
  • Chapter 4 - Aging 133
  • References & Readings 136
  • References & Readings 145
  • Chapter 5 - Women & the Law 147
  • References & Readings 159
  • Chapter 6 - Income Support 161
  • References & Readings 163
  • References & Readings 171
  • References & Readings 173
  • References & Readings 176
  • References & Readings 179
  • References & Readings 182
  • Chapter 7 - Social Workers in Court 189
  • References & Readings 192
  • Chapter 8 - Social Workers as Employees 199
  • References & Readings 201
  • References & Readings 203
  • Chapter 9 - Public Policy 221
  • References & Readings 229
  • References & Readings 231
  • References & Readings 233
  • Glossary 235
  • Recent Bibliography 245
  • Index 263
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