Globalizing Japan: Ethnography of the Japanese Presence in Asia, Europe, and America

By Harumi Befu; Sylvie Guichard-Anguis | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

This volume puts together papers given in a special section for the Japan Anthropology Workshop on "Japan outside Japan" at the eighth International Conference of the European Association for Japanese Studies, which took place in Budapest, Hungary, in 1997. As not all papers presented at the conference could find room in this volume, we would like to thank the participants who contributed to the success of the section, but whose papers could not be included in this volume. Christoph Brumann, Katarzyna Cwiertka, Helen Diakonoff, Jill Kleinberg, Beverley Lee, Andreas K. Riesland, and Masae Yuasa are not to be forgotten.

Conference papers usually are not in immediately publishable form, but need much editing before they are ready for printing in a book. Papers for this conference were no exception. We are indebted to the Institute for Cultural and Human Research of Kyoto Bunkyo University for financial support for the editing process. For the actual editing, Joanne Sandstrom and Hilary Powers provided impeccable professional services, for which all contributors wish to express their gratitude.

Julia Thomas wishes to thank the Michael Shapiro Gallery, the Laurence Miller Gallery, and the Sonnabend Gallery for their help in researching this project.

The extracts from E. Hayashi's 1998 work Shogen: Takasago-Giyutai, reproduced in Chapter 14, are used with the permission of the publisher.

The article 'Consuming the modern: globalization, things Japanese, and the politics of cultural identity on Korea' by Han Seung-Mi was first published in The Journal of Pacific Asia and appears here with the permission of the publisher.

-xxii-

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Globalizing Japan: Ethnography of the Japanese Presence in Asia, Europe, and America
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page v
  • Contents vii
  • Figures xii
  • Tables xiii
  • Series Editor's Preface xvii
  • Preface xix
  • Acknowledgments xxii
  • Part I - Introduction 1
  • 1 - The Global Context of Japan Outside Japan 3
  • Bibliography 21
  • Part II - Human Dispersal 23
  • 2 - Objects, City, and Wandering 25
  • Part III - Organizational Transplant 41
  • 3 - Positioning "Globalization" at Overseas Subsidiaries of Japanese Multinational Corporations 43
  • 4 - Japanese Businesswomen of Yaohan Hong Kong 52
  • Notes 67
  • 5 - Neverland Lost 69
  • Notes 89
  • 6 - Soka Gakkai in Germany 94
  • Part IV - Cultural Diffusion 109
  • 7 - Japanese Comics Coming to Hong Kong 111
  • Bibliography 120
  • 8 - Japanese Popular Music in Hong Kong 121
  • 9 - Global Culture in Question 131
  • Notes 147
  • Bibliography 148
  • Part V - Images 151
  • 10 - A Collision of Discourses 153
  • 11 - Images of the Japanese Welfare State 176
  • Bibliography 190
  • 12 - Consuming the Modern 194
  • 13 - Japan Through French Eyes 209
  • 14 - The Yamatodamashi of the Takasago Volunteers of Taiwan 222
  • Index 251
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