Globalizing Japan: Ethnography of the Japanese Presence in Asia, Europe, and America

By Harumi Befu; Sylvie Guichard-Anguis | Go to book overview

2

Objects, city, and wandering

The invisibility of the Japanese in France

Kazuhiko Yatabe

I accepted the invitation of professors Harumi Befu and Sylvie Guichard-Anguis to prepare an essay for this volume on "Japan outside Japan" and - without asking myself too many questions, I confess - proposed a communication centered on the Japanese in France. 1 For things are essentially simple: the Japanese living in France are, by definition, outside Japan, unless they are gifted with ubiquity.

Before any detailed analysis of this population, as an epistemological preamble, I would like to settle for a while on the link between the perspective of the Japanese in France (but they could as well live in Thailand, Brazil, or Turkey; in Los Angeles, London, or Düsseldorf …) and the perspective of Japan outside Japan. To this aim, I will start with the following question: are we talking in both cases of the same Japan? In fact, the ontological status conferred to the geographical and social entity known as "Japan" as well as to its members changes according to the perspective chosen. Let us study them briefly.

What is the perspective of the Japanese in France? Generally speaking, a researcher who studies a migrant population amid a global society is interested in the processes of negotiating and interacting established between the two parties, a sociological, economic, psychological process ending - or not - with the assimilation or integration of one by the other. To this end, the researcher will of course observe and list the cultural (norms and values) and social (family, village, and so on) resources that the mother society transmits to the migrating population. But the model frame for this research will most of the time be the host society: on the cognitive level, it constitutes what could be defined, as by Geertz (1988), as the "here" of the researcher - who belongs, as a citizen or scholar, to the global society, be it French, American, or other. The classic use of notions such as the ethnic group or minority shows clearly that the immigrants embody an "elsewhere" and are studied according to the norms of the host society. Hence, the Japanese are conceived so to speak in a restricted way: the researcher does not want to contribute to a global definition of nipponity but to understand the precise way in which the Japanese settle in the host society. There is thus schematically an opposition between the "here" of the researcher and the "elsewhere" embodied by Japan

-25-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Globalizing Japan: Ethnography of the Japanese Presence in Asia, Europe, and America
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page v
  • Contents vii
  • Figures xii
  • Tables xiii
  • Series Editor's Preface xvii
  • Preface xix
  • Acknowledgments xxii
  • Part I - Introduction 1
  • 1 - The Global Context of Japan Outside Japan 3
  • Bibliography 21
  • Part II - Human Dispersal 23
  • 2 - Objects, City, and Wandering 25
  • Part III - Organizational Transplant 41
  • 3 - Positioning "Globalization" at Overseas Subsidiaries of Japanese Multinational Corporations 43
  • 4 - Japanese Businesswomen of Yaohan Hong Kong 52
  • Notes 67
  • 5 - Neverland Lost 69
  • Notes 89
  • 6 - Soka Gakkai in Germany 94
  • Part IV - Cultural Diffusion 109
  • 7 - Japanese Comics Coming to Hong Kong 111
  • Bibliography 120
  • 8 - Japanese Popular Music in Hong Kong 121
  • 9 - Global Culture in Question 131
  • Notes 147
  • Bibliography 148
  • Part V - Images 151
  • 10 - A Collision of Discourses 153
  • 11 - Images of the Japanese Welfare State 176
  • Bibliography 190
  • 12 - Consuming the Modern 194
  • 13 - Japan Through French Eyes 209
  • 14 - The Yamatodamashi of the Takasago Volunteers of Taiwan 222
  • Index 251
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 265

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.