Fifty Modern Thinkers on Education: From Piaget to the Present Day

By Joy A. Palmer | Go to book overview

HARRY BROUDY 1905-98

What sort of schooling is needed for enlightened cherishing? Knowledge contributes to enlightenment, but the knowledge that enlightens cherishing includes both scientific knowledge and value knowledge. …Knowledge for enlightened cherishing is sometimes called wisdom, which combines knowledge of human nature with clear-headedness about what can and cannot be accomplished.

(Broudy 1972, p.53)

Harry Broudy was born in Poland to a well-to-do Jewish family, the oldest of four, and started his education in the traditional Cheder. He emigrated with his family to Massachusetts in 1912, and entered American school without knowledge of any English. He received his BA in German Literature and Philosophy from Boston University (1929), and his Ph.D. in Philosophy from Harvard (1935), focusing on Kirkegaard, Bergson and William James.

Broudy came to education largely because of the anti-Semitism in American universities during times which did not promote Jews for faculty in Ivy leagues. Thus, in spite of a prestigious Harvard degree with Whitehead 1 and Perry, he accepted a position at North Adams State Teachers College (1937), where he taught general psychology and philosophy of education. There, he met and married Dorothy Hogarth (1947). Dorothy, a farmer's daughter and a skilful woman, supported Harry in many ways: protected his time, typed his manuscripts, fixed faucets and did the major driving. Their son, Richard, was born in Massachusetts.

Broudy's recruitment to the College of Education at the University of Illinois in 1957, signalled a productive and gratifying second career. There, Broudy was not interested in having an appointment in the Department of Philosophy but focused on education, addressing the areas of curriculum and pedagogy for secondary and tertiary levels, and developing his ideas on the uses of schooling. 2 He retired in 1974 (continuing to be active in campus committees, teaching, advising, and scholarship for the following fifteen years) and was honoured by a three-day conference on the 'Uses of Knowledge in Personal Life and Professional Service'. Broudy lived in Urbana until his death, and could be seen, in his nineties, walking briskly along the lush (and uninterrupted by cars) lane on Race Street, connecting his house to campus.

I met Broudy in the late 1980s. Inspired by his work which I encountered as a graduate student, I was struck in our conversations by his non-assuming presence, as well as acute and sensitive perception, wit, warmth, compassion and succinct sense of humour. In interviews I conducted with his widow, friends, colleagues and students, they highlighted these, and other aspects of the man. Rupert Evans, Dean of the College in the late 1950s and 1960s, talked about Broudy's amazing command of English (Rupert said he never failed to learn from Harry a new word in each conversation), his popularity and effectiveness as a teacher, the esteem he was held in by colleagues, Provost and University Presidents. Gordon Hoke, an educational evaluator, talked about Broudy's insightful contributions in federal agencies and

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Fifty Modern Thinkers on Education: From Piaget to the Present Day
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Contents viii
  • Preface xiv
  • A.S.Neill 1883-1973 1
  • Notes 5
  • Notes 14
  • Notes 27
  • Further Reading 28
  • Notes 32
  • Notes 37
  • Notes 48
  • Carl Rogers 1902-87 49
  • Notes 53
  • Ralph Winifred Tyler 1902-94 54
  • Harry Broudy 1905-98 64
  • Notes 68
  • Further Reading 69
  • Benjamin S.Bloom 1913-99 86
  • Note 89
  • Further Reading 96
  • Notes 117
  • Further Reading 118
  • Notes 140
  • Notes 153
  • Michel Foucault 1926-84 170
  • Donaldson's Major Writings 181
  • Illich's Major Writings 188
  • Further Reading 193
  • Notes 203
  • Nel Noddings 1929- 210
  • Noddings' Major Writings 215
  • Notes 222
  • Notes 228
  • Notes 233
  • Theodore R.Sizer 1932- 241
  • Elliot Eisner 1933- 247
  • Notes 251
  • Lee S.Shulman 1938- 257
  • Notes 270
  • Henry Giroux 1943- 280
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