Fifty Modern Thinkers on Education: From Piaget to the Present Day

By Joy A. Palmer | Go to book overview

during his years as university examiner at the University of Chicago, he not surprisingly became involved in international co-operation in the field. In the early 1960s he was one of the founding members of the International Association for the Evaluation of Educational Achievement (IEA). Later during that decade he was asked by UNESCO to prepare an international seminar on evaluation. This was implemented through a seminar in Gränna, Sweden, in 1971, with participation from some twenty-five developing countries. Bloom himself acted as director of the seminar and leading experts in the field, including Ralph Tyler and John Goodlad served as lecturers. In the same year the book Handbook on Formative and Summative Evaluation came out. It was followed a decade later by Evaluation to Improve Learning. To return to my opening quotation, Benjamin Bloom was indeed psychologist and authority, who influenced generations in their quest to improve educational quality.


Note
1
Award presentation by Phi Delta Kappa and the American Educational Research Association 1970. Quoted in the Phi Delta Kappa Monograph 1971 which published Bloom's lecture at the AERA Meeting in New York City, 6 February 1971, the title of the lecture: 'Individual Differences in School: A Vanishing Point?'

See also

In this book: Goodlad, Tyler


Bloom's major writings

Benjamin S. Bloom was the author or co-author of seventeen major books. The main ones are:

Taxonomy of Educational Objectives: Volume I Cognitive Domain, New York: David McKay and Co., 1956.
Stability and Change in Human Characteristics, New York: John Wiley and Sons, 1964.
Benjamin S. Bloom, with D.B. Masia and D. Krathwohl, Taxonomy of EducationalObjectives: Volume II, The Affective Domain, New York: David McKay and Co., 1964.
with J.T. Hastings, G. Madaus et al.,Handbook on Formative and SummativeEvaluation of Student Learning, New York: McGraw-Hill 1971.
All Our Children Learning: A Primer for Parents, Teachers and other Educators, New York: McGraw-Hill, 1980.
Benjamin S. Bloom, with A. Sosniak, et al.,Developing Talent in Young People, New York: Ballatine, 1985.

In the early 1990s Bloom was a member of the task force appointed by the International Academy of Education, of which he was one of the founders, which looked into the problem of the home-school relationship from the point of view of educational research. The report was published under the title The Home Environment and School Learning, San Francisco, CA: Jossey Bass, 1993, with Thomas Kellaghan et al.

Bloom reported several of his seminar ideas and outcomes of preliminary studies in

-89-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Fifty Modern Thinkers on Education: From Piaget to the Present Day
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Contents viii
  • Preface xiv
  • A.S.Neill 1883-1973 1
  • Notes 5
  • Notes 14
  • Notes 27
  • Further Reading 28
  • Notes 32
  • Notes 37
  • Notes 48
  • Carl Rogers 1902-87 49
  • Notes 53
  • Ralph Winifred Tyler 1902-94 54
  • Harry Broudy 1905-98 64
  • Notes 68
  • Further Reading 69
  • Benjamin S.Bloom 1913-99 86
  • Note 89
  • Further Reading 96
  • Notes 117
  • Further Reading 118
  • Notes 140
  • Notes 153
  • Michel Foucault 1926-84 170
  • Donaldson's Major Writings 181
  • Illich's Major Writings 188
  • Further Reading 193
  • Notes 203
  • Nel Noddings 1929- 210
  • Noddings' Major Writings 215
  • Notes 222
  • Notes 228
  • Notes 233
  • Theodore R.Sizer 1932- 241
  • Elliot Eisner 1933- 247
  • Notes 251
  • Lee S.Shulman 1938- 257
  • Notes 270
  • Henry Giroux 1943- 280
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 303

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.