Fifty Modern Thinkers on Education: From Piaget to the Present Day

By Joy A. Palmer | Go to book overview

Further reading

b
Bakhurt, D. and Shanker, S. (eds), Jerome Bruner: Language, Culture, Self, London: Sage, 2001.
Bruner, J.S., On Knowing: Essays for the Left Hand, Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1979.

d
Dow, P., Schoolhouse Politics: Lessons from the Sputnike Era, Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1991.

o
Olson, D.R. (ed.), The Social Foundations of Language and Thought: Essays in Honorof Jerome S. Bruner, New York: Norton, 1980.
Olson, D.R. and Torrance, N., The Handbook of Education and Human Development, Cambridge, MA: Blackwell, 1996.

HOWARD GARDNER


TORSTEN HUSÉN 1916-

It is relatively easy to proof read life, but very difficult to predict it.

(an oft-repeated saying of Torsten Husén)

Torsten Husén was born on 1st March 1916 in Lund, Sweden. His mother had trained as a telegraphist after having completed her secondary education. His father had five years of half-time primary education, a form of education that was typical in rural areas at that time. He was the manager of a sawmill. Husén grew up in southern Sweden and began primary school at the age of six, one year before the official age of entry to school. He had learned to type at home and therefore told his primary school teacher that he could do this so that it was not necessary for him to learn how to write by hand. He proceeded to his secondary school studies in the Gymnasium in Växjö where he opted to specialize in mathematics and the natural sciences. It was also the tradition that all pupils learned three foreign languages (indeed, it was an entry requirement to upper secondary school). In Husén's case this was German, English and French in that order. His German was so good that he was able to accompany his father on business trips to Poland and Germany where he acted as his interpreter. Although he learned English he was never able to practise it and it was only when he went to England in 1946 as a member of a Swedish delegation that he was actually able to practise speaking English. It was in the 1950s that he began to write some of his books and articles in English. In the end, his English was probably the foreign language in which he was most fluent although his German remained faultless.

In 1935, at the age of nineteen, he entered the University of Lund. He began by studying mathematics, then literature (his first publication was on the influence of French clinical psychology and psychiatry on the work of Strindberg) and history and finally psychology. He has always said that he regarded (and hoped that others would do likewise) the university as a large smorgasbord where one should be able to choose dishes to satisfy intellectual curiosity. It was in his university days that he began to 'write each day' and his way of life soon became nulla dies sine linea. It must have

-96-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Fifty Modern Thinkers on Education: From Piaget to the Present Day
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 303

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.