Fifty Modern Thinkers on Education: From Piaget to the Present Day

By Joy A. Palmer | Go to book overview

Donaldson's major writings

a
A Study of Children's Thinking, London: Tavistock, 1963.

c
Children's Minds, London: Fontana, 1978.

d
Donaldson, M., with Grieve, R. and Pratt, C., Early Childhood Development andEducation: Readings in Psychology, Oxford: Blackwell, 1983.

h
Human Minds: An Exploration, London: Allen Lane, Penguin, 1992.
Humanly Possible: Education and the Scope of the Mind, in D. Olson and N. Torrance (eds), The Handbook of Education and Human Development, Oxford: Blackwell, pp.324-44, 1996.

Further reading

b
Bryant, P., 'Constraints of Context: A Review of Human Minds', Times HigherEducation Supplement, 25 September, 1992.

g
Grieve, R. and Hughes, M., Understanding Children: Essays in Honour of MargaretDonaldson, Oxford: Blackwell, 1990.

MARTIN HUGHES


IVAN ILLICH 1926-

Yes, my work is an attempt to accept with great sadness the fact of Western culture. Dawson has a passage where he says that the Church is Europe and Europe is the Church, and I say yes! Corruptio optimi quae est pessima. Through the attempt to insure, to guarantee, to Regulate Revelation, the best becomes the worst. And yet at any moment we might still recognize, even when we are Palestinians, that there is a Jew lying in the ditch whom I can take in my arms and embrace.

I live also with a profound sense of ambiguity. I can't do without tradition, but I have to recognize that its institutionalization is the root of an evil deeper than any evil I could have known with my unaided eyes and mind. This is what I would call the West. By studying and accepting the West as the perversion of Revelation, I become increasingly tentative, but also more curious and totally engaged in searching for its origin, which is the voice of him who speaks. It's as simple as that…childish if you want, childlike, I hope.

(from Ivan Illich: In Conversation, pp.242-3) 1

Ivan Illich, iconoclastic historian and social critic, has worked as parish priest, university administrator and professor, centre director, lecturer and author. He is best known in educational circles for the work that he did in the late 1960s and 1970s, particularly his second book, Deschooling Society.2 When Illich speaks of 'the West as the perversion of Revelation', one could easily conclude that his theological beliefs have driven his social criticisms. It would be unlikely, however, for students of educational thought to arrive at this same conclusion if they limited their reading of Illich to Deschooling Society. Driven by his belief that any form of secular power or social activism lay beyond the specific mission of the Church, Illich declared, in an

-181-

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Fifty Modern Thinkers on Education: From Piaget to the Present Day
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Contents viii
  • Preface xiv
  • A.S.Neill 1883-1973 1
  • Notes 5
  • Notes 14
  • Notes 27
  • Further Reading 28
  • Notes 32
  • Notes 37
  • Notes 48
  • Carl Rogers 1902-87 49
  • Notes 53
  • Ralph Winifred Tyler 1902-94 54
  • Harry Broudy 1905-98 64
  • Notes 68
  • Further Reading 69
  • Benjamin S.Bloom 1913-99 86
  • Note 89
  • Further Reading 96
  • Notes 117
  • Further Reading 118
  • Notes 140
  • Notes 153
  • Michel Foucault 1926-84 170
  • Donaldson's Major Writings 181
  • Illich's Major Writings 188
  • Further Reading 193
  • Notes 203
  • Nel Noddings 1929- 210
  • Noddings' Major Writings 215
  • Notes 222
  • Notes 228
  • Notes 233
  • Theodore R.Sizer 1932- 241
  • Elliot Eisner 1933- 247
  • Notes 251
  • Lee S.Shulman 1938- 257
  • Notes 270
  • Henry Giroux 1943- 280
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