The Ottoman Empire and Early Modern Europe

By Daniel Goffman | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

Several years ago, Richard Fisher of Cambridge University Press came to me with the suggestion that the Press would like to include a book on the Ottoman Empire in their series New Approaches to European History. This volume is one result of that proposal, and I thank him and Cambridge University Press for wishing to include the Ottoman world in this series. I also am grateful to my editors, Vicky Cuthill, Elizabeth Howard, and Sophie Read, for their diligence and patience with a project that took several detours and arrived at their offices rather late, and to my copy-editor, Leigh Mueller.

As with every such undertaking, this book owes a great deal to many people. Its first draft was sketched out during a rich and exciting year at Boˇgaziçi University in 1993–94. I thank the members of the department of history at that institution – particularly Selim Deringil, Edhem Eldem, Selçuk Esenbel, and Aptullah Kuran – for hosting me and serving as tireless sounding boards. I also thank my own institution, Ball State University, for providing me with time to write this volume, and my Department of History for its support and enthusiasm. Our faculty seminar has become a model of its kind, a sharp and constructive intellectual scalpel, and twice my colleagues – Larry Birken, Jim Connolly, Michael Doyle, Rene Marion, Chris Thompson, and several others – have read, critiqued, and helped shape chapters from this work. I have also twice presented versions of the Kubad Çavuş vignettes publicly, once in 1998 at a conference in Istanbul organized by Suraiya Faroqhi and a second time at New York University at the kind invitation of Ariel Salzmann. Each occasion was stimulating and encouraging, and I thank both the organizers and participants for the opportunities to present and for the lively discussions that followed.

The research and writing of this book relied upon a number of universities, archives, libraries, and endowments. At Ball State University, Ronald Johnstone (the Dean of Sciences and Humanities), Warren Vander Hill (the Provost), Ray White and John Barber (the chairs of the Department

-xvi-

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The Ottoman Empire and Early Modern Europe
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents vii
  • Illustrations ix
  • Maps xii
  • Preface xiii
  • Acknowledgments xvi
  • Note on Usage xix
  • Chronological Table of Events xx
  • The Ottoman House Through 1687 (Dates Are Regnant) xxiii
  • 1 - Introduction: Ottomancentrism and the West 1
  • Part 1 - State and Society in the Ottoman World 21
  • Kubad's Formative Years 23
  • 2 - Fabricating the Ottoman State 27
  • Kubad in Istanbul 55
  • 3 - Aseasoned Polity 59
  • Kubad at the Sublime Porte 93
  • 4 - Factionalism and Insurrection 98
  • Part 2 - The Ottoman Empire in the Mediterranean and European Worlds 129
  • Kubad in Venice 131
  • 5 - The Ottoman—venetian Association 137
  • Kubad Between Worlds 165
  • 6 - Commerce and Diasporas 169
  • Kubad Ransomed 189
  • 7 - Achang Ing Station in Europe 192
  • 8 - Conclusion. the Greater Western World 227
  • Glossary 235
  • Suggestions for Further Reading 240
  • Index 252
  • New Approaches to European History *
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