The Ottoman Empire and Early Modern Europe

By Daniel Goffman | Go to book overview

Kubad between worlds

Anyone who saw the Venetians, a tiny nation living in such liberty that the worst rogue among them would not wish to be their king, anyone, I say, who saw those people and then went to the realm of the man we call the Grand Signor, and saw how people there reckon that the sole purpose of their existence is to serve this man would he reckon that these two nations shared a common nature, or would he not rather judge that he had left a city and entered a sheepfold?1

Kubad finallyleft Venice on 12 February 1568. Even though he would have preferred the speedyand convenient journeybysea across the Adriatic and Aegean seas, he chose instead the land route from Dubrovnik and via Sarajevo and Edirne because of escalating strikes byUskok and Maltese pir ates against Ottoman shipping.2Back in Istanbul he reported to his lords in the Imperial Divan and fulfilled his promise to the Venetian Senate byarr anging for the obliteration of all references to Soranzo's contract with di Segura.3He even convinced the kadi of Galata to tear his copyof the vexing certificate out of his ledger and burn it.

Kubad's willingness to undertake this unlawful act derived partlyfrom expectations for future rewards. Venetian relief at no longer being liable to Ottoman justice was enormous and a grateful bailo compensated the courier well. There was a darker cause, however. He could never have secured the kadi's consent

____________________
1
Etienne de La Boétie, Le discours de la servitude volontaire, ed. P. Léonard (Paris, 1976), p. 135; translated as Slaves bychoice, trans. Malcolm Smith (Egham Hill, Surrey, 1988), p. 54; quoted in Valensi, Birth of the despot, p. 66.
2
Catherine Wendy Bracewell, The Uskoks of Senj: piracy, banditry, and holy war in the sixteenth-century Adriatic (Ithaca, NY, 1992), pp. 58–59, cites a Venetian emissary to Archduke Charles who wrote in 1568 about the escalation of Uskok raiding: “for not only subjects of the Turk who have escaped from their places and have gone to live there are given refuge under the name of uskoks, but also many who have been banished from Ancona, Urbino, and Apulia, and also exiles from all the islands and nearby towns of Your Serenity, and deserters from the galleys, who act as guides and leaders for these wicked men.” See also Kafadar, “Death in Venice, ” p. 200.
3
Although we have no account of Kubad's report to the Imperial Divan, as a çavuş it is likely that he appeared before it.

-165-

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The Ottoman Empire and Early Modern Europe
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents vii
  • Illustrations ix
  • Maps xii
  • Preface xiii
  • Acknowledgments xvi
  • Note on Usage xix
  • Chronological Table of Events xx
  • The Ottoman House Through 1687 (Dates Are Regnant) xxiii
  • 1 - Introduction: Ottomancentrism and the West 1
  • Part 1 - State and Society in the Ottoman World 21
  • Kubad's Formative Years 23
  • 2 - Fabricating the Ottoman State 27
  • Kubad in Istanbul 55
  • 3 - Aseasoned Polity 59
  • Kubad at the Sublime Porte 93
  • 4 - Factionalism and Insurrection 98
  • Part 2 - The Ottoman Empire in the Mediterranean and European Worlds 129
  • Kubad in Venice 131
  • 5 - The Ottoman—venetian Association 137
  • Kubad Between Worlds 165
  • 6 - Commerce and Diasporas 169
  • Kubad Ransomed 189
  • 7 - Achang Ing Station in Europe 192
  • 8 - Conclusion. the Greater Western World 227
  • Glossary 235
  • Suggestions for Further Reading 240
  • Index 252
  • New Approaches to European History *
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