The Ottoman Empire and Early Modern Europe

By Daniel Goffman | Go to book overview

Kubad ransomed

The greatest troubles I have had from [the Turks] have been caused by the men of Senj, who pass in their barks beneath Morlacchia toward Obrovac, come ashore, and do great damage to the Turks, who say that Your Serenity is responsible for guarding them from the sea, and demand that we give them recompense. And so I have chased the Senjani and the said uskoks as much as I have been able.1

It was not until almost two years after Lepanto that Kubad finally was homeward bound toward his beloved metropolis. The war between the Catholic holy league and the Ottoman Empire had sputtered along for over a year after the conquest of Cyprus and the battle off Lepanto. During that time, Kubad remained in Venice, first as prisoner and then as negotiator. The Ottoman captive received manyvisits from Grimani in the weeks after Lepanto. At first, it was clear, the venerable Venetian nobleman was dropping bymerelyto gloat. Gradually, however, the tone of his conversation changed, as he discussed with unease the contrast between a becalmed Venetian arsenal and one in Istanbul that reportedly hummed with unparalleled bustle. In earlyApril, 1572, an edgy Grimani advised Kubad of the rumored launch at the arsenal in the Golden Horn of a fleet of some 200 refurbished and newlybuilt galliots, galleys, and other vessels.

News from the wider world soon confirmed Grimani's fears that Lepanto would prove a sterile victory. Kubad noticed that the euphoric celebrations in Venice and elsewhere that followed Lepanto had slowlysubsided, and heard from his Jewish compatriots that Latin optimism had gradually see ped away into despair as the grand alliance of Catholic powers grew distracted bythe renewed threat from England, France, and a revolt in the Spanish Netherlands, and as the Ottoman navy, seemingly stronger than ever, re-formed itself and again prowled the Adriatic and even pushed into western Mediterranean seas.2He also

____________________
1
Antonio da Mula, Rector of Zadar, Report to the Venetian Senate, c. 1543; as quoted in Bracewell, Uskoks of Senj, pp. 201–2.
2
On Christian–Ottoman relations and especially warfare in this period, see Kenneth M. Setton, Venice, Austria, and the Turks in the seventeenth century (Philadelphia, 1991), pp. 1–39.

-189-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Ottoman Empire and Early Modern Europe
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 273

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.