The Ottoman Empire and Early Modern Europe

By Daniel Goffman | Go to book overview

Index
Abbas, Shah (1587–1629), 87, 214
Abbasid dynasty, 67
Abdal, 74
abdication, 50, 97, 112
abode of the covenant, 46, 177–8
abode of Islam, 46, 58n.10, 61, 101, 131, 153, 170, 173, 178
abode of War, 46, 57, 58n.10, 178
Abraham, 8–9, 99, 109
absolutism, 121
Achaia, 208
Adana, 105
administration, 150–1, 155, 194–5, 197–8, 208
Ottoman, 17, 24, 50–1, 55, 60, 63–4, 65, 67–8, 70–3, 75, 82–3, 110, 121, 123–5, 145, 157–8, 170–1, 180, 182, 199, 201–6, 212–13, 214–15, 221–2, 228, 232
provincial, 77–83, 101–5, 116–17, 120, 196–7, 207
sources on, xiv
see also politics
admiral, 144, 148
see also kapudanpaşa
Adrianople, 36 (map)
see also Edirne
Adriatic sea, 132n.3, 143, 144, 145, 146 (map), 148–9, 152, 165, 177–8, 189, 190–1, 230
advocacy, 68
Aegean sea, 132n.3, 141, 145, 146 (map), 148–9, 151–4, 156, 165, 197, 217, 218
Africa, 51, 139, 221
agriculture, 69, 75–6, 81–2, 83, 89, 153, 158, 193, 212–13, 216, 234
ahdname,171, 172–3, 183, 187, 193, 196, 206–7
see also capitulations
Ahmed Pasha, Melek, xiv, 203, 214, 217
akinci,41n.18, 103, 157
see also cavalry
Akkerman, 102 (map), 103, 182
Akşehir, 105
Albania, 84 (map), 102 (map), 148, 178, 215–16
Aleppo, 15, 17, 72, 83, 87, 90–1, 91, 99, 105, 116–17, 125, 137, 147 (map), 162, 181, 182, 201–5, 206, 208–9, 210–12, 228–9, 231
Alexander the Great, 106–7
Alexandretta, 147 (map), 199, 210
Alexandria, 15, 17, 137, 147 (map), 162, 179, 181, 199, 202 illus., 231
Algeria, 84 (map)
Ali Pasha, Muezzinzade, 159
Allah
see God
alliances, 14, 19, 40, 186, 228
against the Ottomans, 7, 97, 144, 145–9, 156–62, 166–8, 167n.7, 189–90, 194, 216–17
alum, 57, 133
aman,196
ambassadors, 19, 56, 72, 107, 138, 162, 165n.2, 173, 185–7, 197–8, 199, 203, 204, 205, 218–20, 221–2, 223 illus., 229
see also specific states; bailo; diplomacy
America, 5, 29, 111, 113–15, 199, 221, 223, 232–3
natives in, 30, 227
slavery in, 65, 69
see also United States
Amsterdam, 2 (map), 16, 17, 119, 180, 187, 195
Anabaptists, 111
Anadoluhisar, 53 (map), 53–4

-252-

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The Ottoman Empire and Early Modern Europe
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents vii
  • Illustrations ix
  • Maps xii
  • Preface xiii
  • Acknowledgments xvi
  • Note on Usage xix
  • Chronological Table of Events xx
  • The Ottoman House Through 1687 (Dates Are Regnant) xxiii
  • 1 - Introduction: Ottomancentrism and the West 1
  • Part 1 - State and Society in the Ottoman World 21
  • Kubad's Formative Years 23
  • 2 - Fabricating the Ottoman State 27
  • Kubad in Istanbul 55
  • 3 - Aseasoned Polity 59
  • Kubad at the Sublime Porte 93
  • 4 - Factionalism and Insurrection 98
  • Part 2 - The Ottoman Empire in the Mediterranean and European Worlds 129
  • Kubad in Venice 131
  • 5 - The Ottoman—venetian Association 137
  • Kubad Between Worlds 165
  • 6 - Commerce and Diasporas 169
  • Kubad Ransomed 189
  • 7 - Achang Ing Station in Europe 192
  • 8 - Conclusion. the Greater Western World 227
  • Glossary 235
  • Suggestions for Further Reading 240
  • Index 252
  • New Approaches to European History *
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