The Complete Critical Guide to John Milton

By Richard Bradford | Go to book overview
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CHRONOLOGY

1608

John Milton (JM) born 9 December in Bread Street, London.

1620

JM enters St. Paul's School, where he will begin his friendship with Charles Diodati.

1625

JM admitted to Christ's College Cambridge, where some of his first published poems will be written.

1630

Edward King (later the subject of 'Lycidas') elected to fellowship at Christ's.

1632

JM takes M.A. and retires to Horton for several years of private study. 'On Shakespeare' published.

1634

Comus performed.

1637

Comus published.

1638

Lycidas published. JM sails for France (May). Arrives in Italy (August-September), attends Barberini concert and meets, amongst others, Galileo and Frescobaldi. Charles Diodati dies (August).

1639

JM goes to Geneva and meets John Diodati, Calvinist theologian and uncle of late Charles. Returns to England (July).

1641

JM begins to publish political and religious pamphlets, including Animadversions and Of Reformation.

1642

JM marries Mary Powell who, later that year, returns to her family near Oxford, probably because of the recently begun Civil War. (Her family were Royalist, while JM and much of London favoured the Parliamentarians.) Apology for Smectymnuus published.

1643

Doctrine and Disipline of Divorce published.

1644

Of Education and Areopagitica published.

1645

Tetrachordon and Colasterion published. Wife Mary returns.

1646

Poems 1646 published. Daughter Anne born.

1647

Father dies, leaving JM a 'moderate estate'.

1648

Daughter Mary born.

1649

JM appointed Secretary for Foreign Tongues in the victorious Cromwellian government. Tenure of Kings and Magistrates published (February) shortly after the execution of Charles I. Eikonoklastes published.

1651

Defensio pro populo Anglicano published. Son John born.

1652

Deaths of wife Mary, daughter Deborah and son John. Becomes totally blind.

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