Win-Win Ecology: How the Earth's Species Can Survive in the Midst of Human Enterprise

By Michael L. Rosenzweig | Go to book overview

Acknowledgements

The Morris K. Udall Center for Public Policy supported the initial work on this book during the time I was a Fellow in 1997. The U.S.–Israel Binational Science Foundation helped with some travel expenses. Evolutionary Ecology, Ltd. provided access to its office equipment and supplies. Carole Rosenzweig accompanied me on all but one of the journeys connected with this book. Carole also read the earliest draft (and others) and helped spot many weaknesses, and also helped in obtaining illustrations. Jerry Winakur read the second draft and then provided inestimable advice and moral support. Carole, Jerry, Lee McAden Robinson and I met in Texas to work on the title and subtitle of the book, and to identify and highlight its predominant message. Ron Pulliam's smile and confidence led me to the idea of reconciliation ecology in the first place. David Policansky introduced me to Daniel Pauly's shifting baseline syndrome; I profited greatly from our discussions of it. Many colleagues and students around the world gave me leads that resulted in most of the examples in the book. These include Sarah Armstrong, Alona Bachi, Andrew Balmford, Caleb Gordon, Deborah Gur-Arie, Christine Hawkes, Brian Knauss, John Lawton, Jeff Mitton, Han Olff, Stuart Pimm, Paul Richards and Jerry Winakur. One in particular, Reuven Yosef, provided three examples and the hospitality required to see them first hand in Israel and Florida. I mention others in the credits of illustrations and in endnotes. Thanks to them all.

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