Operetta: A Theatrical History

By Richard Traubner | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

The following individuals and institutions were of invaluable assistance in the preparation of this book. My heartfelt thanks to them all, alphabetically:

Alan Abrams, Reginald Allen, Antonio de Almeida, the Austrian Institute, New York, Kathy Bayer, Ian Bevan, the Bibliothèque Nationale, Paris, the entire staff of the Billy Rose Theatre and Music Collections, Lincoln Center, New York, Edith Böheim, Gerald Bordman, Russell Brown, John Cannon, Carlos Clarens, Mervyn E. Clay, Danièlle Cornille, John Coveney, Ken Dixon, Gail D'Luhy, Frederick and Phyllis Doppelt, Bridget D'Oyly Carte, D.B.E., Ingrid Eckardt, Chris Ellis, William K. Everson, Harry Forbes, George Forrest and Robert Wright, Charles Forsythe, Beverley Vawter Gallegos, Kurt Gänzl, Louise Gault, John Gillett, Sam Goldsman, Paul Gover, Henry Anatole Grunwald, Paul Gumhalter, Howard Hart, Hans Heinsheimer, Michael Hofmann, Erzsi Horváth, Arthur Jacobs, Richard Jarman, Charles, Vera, and Yvonne Kálmán, Larry Kardish, Peter Kemp, Courtney and Caroline Kenny, Hilary Knight, Richard Kutner, Andrew Lamb, Robert Lantz, Tom Mack, Adrienne Mancia, Kenneth Mandelbaum, Dennis C. Miller, Norman Miller, Allan and Bob Morris and families, William Mount-Burke, Richard C. Norton, Patrick O'Connor, the Österreichische Nationalbibliothek, Vienna, Sheila Porter, Robert Pourvoyeur, Colin Prestige, Terence Rees, Johannes Reuther, Glenn Rounds, Brian Salesky, Helen Salomon, Ingrid Scheib-Rothbart, Alexander Schouvaloff, Eugene and Lillian Schuster, Beverly Sills, Alfred E. Simon, Dinah Spinetti, Ruth, Käthe, and Walter Strasser, Michael G. Thomas, Richard Toeman, Romano Tozzi, Milton Traubner, Muriel Traubner, Albert Truelove, Douglas Tunstell, the staff of the Volksoper, Vienna, Hugh Wheeler, Susan Woelzl, John Wolfson, Peter Wood, Hope and Jay Yampol, and Pablo Zinger.

-vii-

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Operetta: A Theatrical History
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Acknowledgments vii
  • Introduction viii
  • Overture 1
  • Beginners, Please! 19
  • The Emperor of Operetta 55
  • Post-1870 Paris 75
  • Vienna Gold 103
  • The School of Strauss II 133
  • The Savoy Tradition 149
  • The Edwardesian Era 187
  • Fin De SiÈcle 221
  • The Merry Widow and Her Rivals 243
  • Silver Vienna 275
  • Continental Varieties 303
  • The West End 339
  • American Operetta 357
  • Broadway 377
  • Pasticcio and Zarzuela, Italy and Russia 423
  • Bibliography 434
  • Index 441
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