Operetta: A Theatrical History

By Richard Traubner | Go to book overview

POST-1870 PARIS

THE FRANCO-Prussian War (1870) did not immediately change the taste of Parisians for certain kinds of operetta, but it was a decisive blow against opéra-bouffe. Before the war, Second Empire frivolity sanctioned entertainments that were lighthearted, silly, boisterous, licentious (certainly by British standards), and satirical, with the accent clearly on gaiety. The pettiness of the court and government of Napoléon III and the specter of Bismarck had already been alluded to in two offenbachiades: La Périchole and La Grande-Duchesse de Gérolstein, and by the late 1860s there were critics already condemning the satire in the libretti, possibly because these situations were simply becoming too serious to satirize.

The war and the Commune confirmed how serious they were, and quite abruptly ended not only the reign of Napoléon (who fled to England) but also the frivolity connected with his reign, at least for several months. By the autumn of 1871, theatrical activity began to flourish again. At first, Parisians wanted the same fare they had had during the Empire: folly, gaiety, the lightest operettas. Les Brigands, even though it had forecast the sound of military boots approaching, was enthusiastically reprised at the Variétés; the Bouffes-Parisiens remounted Les Bavards and La Princesse de Trébizonde, also by Offenbach. Le Roi Carotte was a spectacular hit for Offenbach at the Gaîté in January 1872. Hervé's Le Trône d'Écosse next appeared at the Variétés. But all of the 1871-72 operettas were swept aside by the triumph of Charles Lecocq's La Fille de Madame Angot at the end of 1872, in Brussels. When it arrived in Paris in 1873, Lecocq effectively replaced Offenbach as the emperor of operetta.

The operettas of the Third Republic became more differentiated than the everpopular opéras-bouffes of the previous decades. With composers like Planquette, romance, preferably of the sentimental, costumed kind, became entirely more popular than the satire that had previously reigned in Offenbach's heyday. Comedy was not—needless to say—banished, so that by the 1880s the vaude-

-75-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Operetta: A Theatrical History
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Acknowledgments vii
  • Introduction viii
  • Overture 1
  • Beginners, Please! 19
  • The Emperor of Operetta 55
  • Post-1870 Paris 75
  • Vienna Gold 103
  • The School of Strauss II 133
  • The Savoy Tradition 149
  • The Edwardesian Era 187
  • Fin De SiÈcle 221
  • The Merry Widow and Her Rivals 243
  • Silver Vienna 275
  • Continental Varieties 303
  • The West End 339
  • American Operetta 357
  • Broadway 377
  • Pasticcio and Zarzuela, Italy and Russia 423
  • Bibliography 434
  • Index 441
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 461

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.