Sports Management and Administration

By David C. Watt | Go to book overview

1

Sport—what it's all about
This chapter sets out to define sport, giving it a setting in a UK environment, with afterthoughts on how this perspective guides modern-day thinking and practice. It proceeds to consider sports participation trends and costs, before moving on to assess the economic impact of sport and how spending trends are moving. Sports clubs are then examined—their operation, style and effectiveness.
Parameters and definitions

Sport was born of a man's highest ideals and has been around for 33 centuries, which is longer than any other religion, culture or sub-culture; and must be defended and harnessed for its values.

Ron Pickering

The council of Europe's European Sports Charter, adopted in 1992, defines sport as 'all forms of physical activity which, through casual or organized participation, aim at expressing or improving physical activity fitness and mental wellbeing, forming social relationships or obtaining results in competition at all levels' (Council of Europe, 1992). It is important to be clear about what is meant by the key terms used in this text. As with almost any word or concept, contrasting meanings and interpretations can be adopted by different individuals or groups on varying occasions. For the purposes of this text the following definitions and meanings will be adopted.
Where the term recreation is used, it is understood that the recreation is of a physical nature.
Recreation is seen as the physical (when related to sport and usually the allied mental) re-creating (renewing) of the body and the person.
Sport is seen as a physically active pastime participated in at a wide variety of levels, under agreed rules; not necessarily, but often, in a competitive setting; at the very least competing against oneself.
Activity is the specific thing which is done to exert the energy—in this text its use will be a sport of some sort.

-9-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Sports Management and Administration
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 283

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.