Sports Management and Administration

By David C. Watt | Go to book overview

11

Marketing

This chapter covers the important, if often misunderstood, area of marketing. It starts by emphasizing the need to be businesslike and to take a wide view of marketing—seeing it as integral to the management process, not as just an 'add-on'. It expands on this ethos and gives a number of practical illus-trations, both positive and negative. It then establishes the marketing mix of the four 'p's seen as relevant to sports marketing. Each of them is explained and illustrated in the context of sport. Later concepts such as marketing ethics and participation are considered, before looking at how the process is implemented and what activities are undertaken. It is suggested that an organizational SWOT analysis may be helpful. Public relations, fundraising and sponsorship are then examined, with examples.

'Brusque to the point of being businesslike.' This statement reflects a British viewpoint that being professional and businesslike means being curt and short with customers and clients. In a true customer-care focused business this is exactly the opposite of the truth; being businesslike is about spending time with clients, getting to know what they want and meeting their needs.

Business has only two functions: marketing and innovation.

Peter F. Drucker

Marketing is a key area of operation for all modern-day businesses. It must be seen as a process, not a theoretical concept, and must be a shared concept for every one of the staff. Marketing should be seen as the responsibility not of one individual but of every person working in the business of sport. It is often believed that marketing is the weakest part of some sports operations. This may well be due to the fact that the term is not understood by many and so is not implemented by everyone as it needs to be.

The definitions of marketing are many. However, all of them place the customer as 'king' and emphasize that the manager's job is to ensure that this is the case on every occasion, and in every circumstance. Sports administration is a client-led business.

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Sports Management and Administration
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Figures and Table ix
  • Case Studies x
  • Acknowledgements xi
  • About the Author xii
  • Introduction 1
  • 1 - Sport—what It's All About 9
  • 2 - The Sporting Context 23
  • 3 - The Voluntary Sector 47
  • 4 - Sports Development 65
  • 5 - Leadership 76
  • 6 - Working Together 82
  • 7 - People 96
  • 8 - Organizational Management 115
  • 9 - Management in Practice 139
  • 10 - Management Challenges 157
  • 11 - Marketing 166
  • 12 - Event Management 186
  • 13 - Education and Training 211
  • 14 - Personal Skills 228
  • 15 - Into the Future 240
  • Appendix: Useful Sports Contacts and Addresses 244
  • Bibliography 265
  • Index 275
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