Wars on Terrorism and Iraq: Human Rights, Unilateralism, and U.S. Foreign Policy

By Thomas G. Weiss; Margaret E. Crahan et al. | Go to book overview

Notes
1
On the origins and evolution of the concepts of the state and sovereignty see Bernard Guernée, States and Rulers in Later Medieval Europe, trans. Juliet Vale (New York: Blackwell, 1985); Andrew Vincent, Theories of the State (London: Blackwell, 1987); Julian H. Franklin, John Locke and the Theory of Sovereignty (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1978); W. Ross Johnston, Sovereignty and Protection: A Study of British Jurisdictional Imperialism in the Late Nineteenth Century (Durham, N.C.: Duke University Press, 1973).
2
See, for example, Thomas Risse, Stephen C. Ropp, and Kathryn Sikkink, eds., The Power of Human Rights: International Norms and Domestic Change (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1999); and Jack Donnelly, Universal Human Rights in Theory and Practice, 2nd edition (Ithaca, N.Y.: Cornell University Press, 2003).
3
Stephen Krasner, Sovereignty: Organized Hypocrisy (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1999).
4
International Commission on Intervention and State Sovereignty, The Responsibility to Protect (Ottawa: ICISS, 2001). For the background research, see Thomas G. Weiss and Don Hubert, The Responsibility to Protect: Research, Bibliography, and Background (Ottawa: ICISS, 2001).
5
See "Address Before a Joint Session of the Congress on the Persian Gulf Crisis and the Federal Budget Deficit, " September 11, 1990, http://bushlibrary.tamu.edu/papers/1990/90091101.html.
6
The implications for international law and organization are explored in Michael Byers and Georg Nolte, eds., United States Hegemony and the Foundations of International Law (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2003); and Rosemary Foot, S. Neil MacFarlane, and Michael Mastanduno, eds., U.S. Hegemony and International Organizations (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2003). For contemporary political snapshots, see Niall Ferguson, "Hegemony or Empire?" Foreign Affairs, 82 no. 5 (September- October 2003), pp. 154-61; and Joseph S. Nye Jr., "The Velvet Hegemon, " Foreign Policy, no. 136 (May-June 2003), pp. 74-5.
7
Lawyers Committee for Human Rights, Assessing the New Normal: Liberty and Security for the Post-September 11 United States (New York: Lawyers Committee for Human Rights, September 2003).
8
See Stephen C. Schlesinger, Act of Creation: The Founding of the United Nations (Boulder, CO: Westview, 2003).
9
For the international legal framework for responding to terrorism see Inter-American Commission on Human Rights, Organization of American States, Report on Terrorism and Human Rights (Washington, D.C.: Organization of American States, 2002), pp. 33-68.
10
For alternative scenarios, see Council on Foreign Relations, A New National Security Strategy in an Age of Terrorists, Tyrants, and Weapons of Mass Destruction (New York: Council on Foreign Relations, 2003).
11
"National Security Strategy of the United States of America, September 2002, " http://usinfo.state.gov/topical/pol/terror/secstrat/htm.
12
John Lewis Gaddis, "A Grand Strategy, " Foreign Policy, no. 133 (November-December 2002), pp. 54, 56.
13
Madeleine K. Albright, "Bridges, Bombs, or Bluster?", Foreign Affairs 82, no. 5 (September-October 2003), p. 11.
14
Mary Robinson, "Shaping Globalization: The Role of Human Rights, " Fifth Annual Grotius lecture, American Society of International Law, April, Washington, D.C., 2003.
15
See "Adoption of Policy of Pre-emption Could Result in Proliferation of Unilateral Lawless Use of Force, Secretary-General Tells General Assembly, " SG/SM 8891

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Wars on Terrorism and Iraq: Human Rights, Unilateralism, and U.S. Foreign Policy
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Foreword xiii
  • Preface xix
  • Abbreviations xxii
  • Introduction 1
  • The Serendipity of War, Human Rights, and Sovereignty 3
  • Part 1 - Framing the Debate 27
  • 1 - The Interplay of Domestic Politics, Human Rights, and U.S. Foreign Policy 29
  • 2 - Pre-Emption and Exceptionalism in U.S. Foreign Policy 61
  • Notes 72
  • Part 2 - Human Rights and the War on Terrorism 75
  • 3 - U.S. Foreign Policy and Human Rights in an Era of Insecurity 77
  • 4 - International Human Rights 98
  • 5 - The Fight Against Terrorism 113
  • Part 3 - U.S. Unilateralism in the Wake of Iraq 133
  • 6 - Bush, Iraq, and the U.N. 135
  • 7 - The War Against Iraq 155
  • 8 - The Future of U.S.-European Relations 174
  • 9 - Legal Unilateralism 188
  • 10 - Tactical Multilateralism 209
  • Notes 227
  • Conclusion 229
  • Whither Human Rights, Unilateralism, and U.S. Foreign Policy? 231
  • Notes 240
  • Index 242
  • Routledge Essential Reading 248
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