Qualitative Research in Tourism: Ontologies, Epistemologies and Methodologies

By Jenny Phillimore; Lisa Goodson | Go to book overview

18

Translators, trust and truth

Cross-cultural issues in sustainable tourism research
Guy Jobbins
Aims of the chapter
To highlight some issues relevant to working in cross-cultural environments.
To outline methods of managing translators in interview situations.
To demonstrate problems of evaluating rapport in interviews.
To demonstrate the utility of reflexivity in evaluating the quality of responses.

Introduction

This chapter is based on my involvement in the MECO project, a multidisciplinary and multinational research programme which considered the integrated sustainable management of Mediterranean sandy beaches. My role on the project was to analyse social, economic and institutional aspects of human uses of beaches and nearby coastlands and waters in Morocco and Tunisia. Of particular interest to the project was the establishment of guidelines for tourism development and management at the study sites, with reference to existing resource uses and practises. This meant that I was looking at the dynamics between a range of sectors including tourism, conservation and agriculture, and between the resource use and management regimes governing each sector. The political sensitivities of this work, touching on governmental decision-making processes, public accountability and, sometimes, illegality, meant that accurate information was difficult to obtain. This chapter reflects on my experiences in establishing dialogue with a wide range of stakeholders, and the problems of using translators and negotiating meaning across barriers of language and culture.

For someone like myself, with a background in ecosystem sciences, conducting qualitative research is an unnerving experience. Quantitative data offer a feeling of certainty, rightly or not, that I do not find in qualitative data. When first learning about qualitative research for the MECO project, I was naively horrified by the potential problems in ascribing

-311-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Qualitative Research in Tourism: Ontologies, Epistemologies and Methodologies
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 334

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.