ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

I have incurred many obligations in the writing of this book, which has taken far longer than I or the original editor of the series, the late Roger French, envisaged. Many parts of this have been presented at conferences or seminars around the world, and I am grateful for the comments and criticisms of the audiences on these occasions, and particularly in London, Paris and Pisa. Several colleagues read and commented on the manuscript either in whole or in part: Elizabeth Craik, Jason Davies, Helen King, Cornelius O'Boyle, Thomas Rütten, Manuela Tecusan, Philip van der Eijk and Heinrich von Staden. Isabella Andorlini, Klaus-Dietrich Fischer, Ivan Garofalo, Mariaelena Gorrini, Ralph Jackson, Marie-Hélène Marganne, Innocenzo Mazzini and Gotthard Strohmaier kept me informed of very recent discoveries in their particular fields of interest, and allowed me to cite some of their work when it was still unpublished. Ralph Jackson and Nikolai Serikoff kindly provided photographs from their own collections. I also had the privilege of discussing many of the ideas in this book with two friends who, in their different ways, made a great contribution to the study of ancient medicine, Luis Garcia Ballester and Owsei Temkin. Neither, I am sure, would have entirely approved of some of my speculations, but both would have encouraged me in my aim of presenting to a wider public the recent findings of my own and others' scholarship.

This book represents the fruit of a long association with the Wellcome Trust and the Wellcome Institute for the History of Medicine, as it was called before its enforced dissolution in 2000. My academic colleagues, now within the Wellcome Trust Centre for the History of Medicine at UCL, have long tolerated my eccentric interests in our shared field, and a stream of research students and research fellows has ensured that my ideas have been constantly challenged. My secretaries, Frieda Houser and Sally Bragg, brought a certain degree of order to my life, usually to the strains of music. Jane Henderson undertook the major task of compiling the index. A generation of medical students has cheerfully listened to tales of Dr Galen, and, although they may not credit it, has also taught me much about medicine and about presentational skills. Successive heads of the Department of Anatomy, notably Geoff Burnstock and Nigel Holder, have encouraged my researches as part of the department's wider programme.

-xi-

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Ancient Medicine
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Illustrations vii
  • Note to the Reader ix
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • Abbreviations xiii
  • 1 - Sources and Scope 1
  • 2 - Patterns of Disease 19
  • 3 - Before Hippocrates 37
  • 4 - Hippocrates, the Hippocratic Corpus and the Defining of Medicine 53
  • 5 - Hippocratic Theories 72
  • 6 - Hippocratic Practices 87
  • 7 - Religion and Medicine in Fifth- and Fourth-Century Greece 103
  • 8 - From Plato to Praxagoras 115
  • 9 - Alexandria, Anatomy and Experimentation 128
  • 10 - Hellenistic Medicine 140
  • 11 - Rome and the Transplantation of Greek Medicine 157
  • 12 - The Consequences of Empire: Pharmacology, Surgery and the Roman Army 171
  • 13 - The Rise of Methodism 187
  • 14 - Humoral Alternatives 202
  • 15 - The Life and Career of Galen 216
  • 16 - Galenic Medicine 230
  • 17 - All Sorts and Conditions of (Mainly) Men 248
  • 18 - Medicine and the Religions of the Roman Empire 273
  • 19 - Medicine in the Later Roman Empire 292
  • 20 - Conclusion 310
  • Notes 317
  • Bibliography 419
  • Index of Names 465
  • Index of Topics 478
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