The Presence of the Therapist: Treating Childhood Trauma

By Monica Lanyado | Go to book overview

A note on confidentiality

As a psychotherapist, writing about the very private experience of what happens in the consulting room is a rather strange endeavour. It feels like facing inwards and outwards at the same time, simultaneously being both highly introspective about the therapeutic process and highly public in trying to communicate this process to the reader. Confidentiality and privacy are so vital to the trust that the patient feels in the therapist that it is very difficult to write about therapeutic experience unless there is a great deal of thought about clinical ethics (McFarland Solomon and Twyman 2003).

There are a number of ways in which this difficult issue has been addressed in my past publications and in this book. Above all, I hope that should by any chance a patient, relative or friend of a patient recognise anyone in my writings, they will feel that I have described what took place between us in a humane and respectful manner. The only reason for writing about the therapeutic process is to add to the knowledge, understanding and necessary debates that must go on within psychoanalytic practice, if it is not to be accused of being secretive and not open to scrutiny.

Practically, I have thought carefully about the issue of confidentiality at the time of writing, on an individual basis for each of the children discussed in this book. As the papers span a period of 18 years, there has been dramatic change in general professional guidance about how to protect patients' confidentiality. The internet was only in highly restricted use when three of the papers were written in the mid to late 1980s. At that time, papers published in professional journals were likely to be in very limited circulation. There was of course still careful attention to disguise patients' identities, but there was certainly less likelihood that patients would come across these journals. The situation is entirely different now, and this presents our profession with major dilemmas, which are constantly under discussion (Gabbard 2000; Tuckett 2000).

The question of whether patients can give informed consent to their therapy being written about is particularly thorny and complicated when considering child patients, where it is the parents or carers who have to be consulted. Advantages and disadvantages of asking for patient consent are

-xiii-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Presence of the Therapist: Treating Childhood Trauma
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 145

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.