Food and Cultural Studies

By Bob Ashley; Joanne Hollows et al. | Go to book overview

1

Food-cultural studies - three paradigms

Mike Leigh's 1991 film Life is Sweet depicts a restaurateur called Aubrey, nervously awaiting the opening of his bistro, the Regret Rien. In an attempt to impress a waitress with his savoir-faire, Aubrey runs through his first night menu, an offal-rich list that includes hors d'ooeuvres of tripe soufflé and saveloy on a bed of lychees. The waitress reacts with horror ('Oh, not brains!') and Aubrey's prospective clientele agree: no one shows up for the opening.

Aubrey's comical menu is, of course, a satire on contemporary food trends. There has indeed been something of an offal boom in recent years, exemplified by London's St John restaurant which features such delights as bone marrow salad and crispy pigs' tails (Henderson, 2000). Equally, there has been a vogue for combining ingredients from different parts of the world in new, and not always appetising, ways. If Aubrey's idea of fusion cooking is a peculiarly distasteful one ('tongues in a rhubarb hollandaise; liver in lager'), it is also one recognizable in newspaper restaurant reviews. This chapter will also attempt to fuse diverse ingredients, though the result is not, we hope, a tripe soufflé. The stew we propose to produce by the end of the chapter is a brief and provisional history of what we will term 'food-cultural studies'. To achieve this we focus on a particular moment in the formation of what has come to be known, generally critically, as 'British' Cultural Studies (see, for example, Turner, 1990; Clarke, 1991; Schwarz, 1994). At a key point in its development a polarization of 'culturalist' and 'structuralist' methods was partially and temporarily resolved through the adaptation of Gramscian hegemonic theory. Analysis of this moment allows us to return to 'the fundamental issue for any kind of cultural study' (Tudor, 1999:17), namely the complex relationship between power structures of various kinds and human agency. A hegemonic approach is used to suggest one way in which 'dominant' ideologies and the aspirations of subordinate groups might be usefully articulated together. The three sections therefore offer

-1-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Food and Cultural Studies
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 240

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.