Food and Cultural Studies

By Bob Ashley; Joanne Hollows et al. | Go to book overview

11

Television chefs

Following on from our discussion of food writing, this chapter considers how food, and, in particular, the meaning of cookery, is represented on TV. This takes place in a context in which there is a strong relationship between the cookbooks that become bestsellers and television cookery shows: many of the bestselling cookbooks in the UK are written by television chefs. However, as this chapter goes on to explore, if television now plays an important role in mediating how we understand food, cookery also makes an important contribution to contemporary television culture as part of the expansion of lifestyle programming. Therefore, the first part of this chapter examines the relationship between television cookery shows, the television industry and the restaurant business. In the process, we explore how celebrity chefs become 'brands' and how their cultural significance is also related to industrial concerns. The second part of the chapter examines some of the ways in which cookery shows mediate food knowledges and the implications this may have for everyday food practices.

Before proceeding to these issues, it is worth noting that this chapter is written in the context of the boom in television cookery which occurred in the 1990s, amidst a wider boom in lifestyle programming. In the UK, not only are there numerous cookery shows on both daytime and prime-time television on the five terrestrial channels, but there are also non-terrestrial channels devoted to food such as UK Food. Nor is the UK alone in this trend: many countries now have cable channels devoted to food such as the Food Network in the USA and Cuisine TV in France. In this apparent explosion of interest in television cookery, a number of chefs, fuelled by extensive newspaper coverage, have gained 'celebrity status', featuring in magazines such as Hello and OK. Likewise, just as a feud between rock stars is deemed newsworthy, so was a public disagreement among celebrity chefs as the following report from the 'quality' UK newspaper, The Guardian, shows:

-171-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Food and Cultural Studies
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Acknowledgements vi
  • Preface vii
  • 1 - Food-Cultural Studies - Three Paradigms 1
  • 2 - The Raw and the Cooked 27
  • 3 - Food, Bodies and Etiquette 41
  • 4 - Consumption and Taste 59
  • 5 - The National Diet 75
  • 6 - The Global Kitchen 91
  • 7 - Shopping for Food 105
  • 8 - Eating In 123
  • 9 - Eating Out 141
  • 10 - Food Writing 153
  • 11 - Television Chefs 171
  • 12 - Food Ethics and Anxieties 187
  • Index 229
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 240

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.