Reassessing Political Ideologies: The Durability of Dissent

By Michael Freeden | Go to book overview

Contributors

Terrell Carver is Professor of Political Theory at the University of Bristol. He has degrees from Columbia University and the University of Oxford, and has published widely on Marx and Engels. His most recent book is The Postmodern Marx (Manchester University Press, 1998), and he has also done the new translations of Marx's Later Political Writings (Cambridge University Press, 1996).

Diana Coole is Professor of Political Theory and head of department at Queen Mary and Westfield College, University of London. She is the author of Women in Political Theory, Harvester-Wheatsheaf, second edition 1993, and Negativity and Politics, Routledge, 2000. She is currently writing a book for Routledge on Merleau-Ponty and the Political.

Robert Eccleshall is Professor of Politics at the School of Politics of the Queen's University of Belfast, and Head of the School. He is the author of English Conservatism Since the Restoration (1990) and the co-author of Political Ideologies (second edition, 1994; third edition, forthcoming). He is also co-editor of Western Political Thought: A Bibliographical Guide to Post-War Research (1995), Biographical Dictionary of British Prime Ministers (1998) and Political Discourse in Seventeenth and Eighteenth Century Ireland (2001).

Michael Freeden is Professor of Politics at Oxford University and Professorial Fellow of Mansfield College, Oxford. Among his books are The New Liberalism: An Ideology of Social Reform, Clarendon Press, 1978; Liberalism Divided: A Study in British Political Thought 1914-1939, Clarendon Press, 1986; Reappraising J.A. Hobson (ed.), Unwin Hyman, 1990; Rights, Open University Press, 1991; Ideologies and Political Theory: A Conceptual Approach, Clarendon Press, 1996. He is the founder-editor of the Journal of Political Ideologies.

Gerald F. Gaus is Professor of Philosophy and Political Science at Tulane University, New Orleans. He has been Research Fellow at the Australian National University and Visiting Scholar at the Social Philosophy and Policy Center, Bowling Green State University. He is the author of The Modern Liberal Theory of Man (1983), Value and Justification (1990), Justificatory Liberalism (1996), Social Philosophy (1999) and Political Theories and Political Concepts (2000). He is co-editor of Public and Private in Social Life (1983) and Public Reason (1998), and of Bernard Bosanquet's The Philosophical Theory of the State and Related Essays (2000). Professor Gaus is an editor of the Australasian Journal of Philosophy.

Roger Griffin is Professor of History of Ideas at Oxford Brookes University. He is the author of The Nature of Fascism (1991, 1993), and editor of Fascism (1995) and International Fascism: Theories, Causes, and the New Consensus (1998). In addition he has published widely articles and chapters on comparative aspects of interwar fascism as well as neo-fascism and new forms of the radical right, nationalism, racism, modernity and globalization. He is at present working on a major study of the relationship between modernity, modernism and fascism.

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