Domestic Violence: A Handbook for Health Professionals

By Lyn Shipway | Go to book overview

Acknowledgements

I would like to thank Routledge for the opportunity to fulfil a long-time ambition, the chance to hopefully make a difference by supporting my healthcare colleagues to recognize and deal with the numerous clients that seek help to combat the effects of domestic abuse.

My gratitude to Dr Dawn Hillier, Dean of Health Care Practice, for her support and guidance; to Professor Gina Wisker for her patience when other deadlines were delayed in order that I could focus on writing the book; to Professor Colin Harrison who funded the writing of my first open learning package in domestic violence; to the students who have undertaken my Domestic Abuse modules, and even now are making an impact in midwifery practice and within other clinical settings; and to those colleagues in Health Care Practice, and in the University Centre for Learning and Teaching, who have helped to keep me resolute, you know who you are.

In particular I would like to thank my colleagues, and now my friends, Jean Flint, Catherine Wright, Hazel Taylor and Sharon Waller for their continuing friendship, humour, insight and support; Andrew Wood and Maurice Crockard for their fortitude, for their words of wisdom and for lending a listening ear; and to my colleagues in Ashby House who never fail to keep me grounded. I would like to acknowledge the work undertaken by Victim Support Essex and the opportunity they give me to continue to work with individuals who experience abuse and violence at the hands of an intimate partner.

In addition, to my son-in-law Jason, to my family in Wales, and to my friends, thank-you for being there. To my friends Marilyn Fenner and Jo Colling, a special thank-you for your unwavering faith in my ability to complete the project and to do it well.

I would like to acknowledge the individuals and organizations that have allowed me to draw upon their expertise in the subject with particular thanks to those whose work has been reproduced within the text and the appendices. Especial thanks to Women's Aid Federation of England, Newham Domestic Violence Forum, and Dr Iona Heath from the Royal College of General Practitioners. Crown Copyright material is produced with permission of the Controller of HMSO and the Queen's Printer for Scotland.

Never has there been a better time to act to curtail violence and abuse in the home. We therefore offer our gratitude and admiration to the women who have worked so tirelessly and with such passion and dedication over the past decades to bring today's practitioners in the field to the point where our work in this area is now possible and will in time become mainstream.

-xi-

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