Dictionary of Terrorism

By John Richard Thackrah | Go to book overview

Preface and Acknowledgements

This work explains the aims and purpose of terrorism and many issues in achieving a broad-based strategy against terrorism. What we all fear as a global community is that terrorists seek to force, through the use of fear, the adoption of measures of a police state. One has to bear in mind, in devising such policy and tactics, the crisis management capability; the involvement of the state in countering state sponsored terrorism; the balance between media coverage and any censorship; the use of the military; the policy of negotiating, if at all, with terrorists, and their legal status and international response. Some of the root causes of the problem of terrorism seem too intractable for many countries to face; for example, the challenges of poverty, bribery and corruption, and the absence of a binding definition of terrorism in international law. The economic gap between the global North and South continues to widen; and the growth of the Third World gives rise to economic hopelessness.

There are many differing approaches to educating people about terrorism: dissertations, analytical and comparative studies, and appraisals of the political and economic responses to terroristic violence. To help us understand the subject there are training and information manuals, research monographs, databases, bibliographies, encyclopaedias and dictionaries. In this dictionary I have chosen examples, ideas, groups, people and events that epitomise the whole issue, given the constraints on the length of the work. It is a sad reflection that many tomes are needed to give a full and comprehensive analysis of a phenomenon that has been with us in varied forms, terms and guises throughout history.

As the book goes to print at the dawn of the twenty-first century, the world has witnessed a new type of transnational terrorist, skilled in the use of transnational communications and financial returns as a means of co-ordinating the activities of dispersed followers who have made no promises to any state and have no territorial desires. Governments are very concerned that they are being increasingly bypassed by terrorists.

The first edition was referred to as an encyclopaedia, but the changes made in this second edition have moved the author to change the title to that of dictionary, especially as there are so many different definitions and an ever increasing variation of terminology of different types of terrorism. The work can be viewed as a constant reference and bulky topics such as September 11, 2001 and the different aspects of terrorism can be viewed under the headings September 11 and Terror and Terrorism. Detailed cross-referencing takes the reader to various parts of the book. After most entries there are References and Further Reading, and at the back of the book a selection of website addresses from where further information can be gleaned. Cross-referencing proves that terrorism crosses many academic boundaries, and this is enhanced by a conceptual map which helps apply a mental/philosophical appraisal across the topics of the entries. Some entries have been updated since May 2003 at proof stage.

This work will be of use to those involved in academia, the military, government, business and law enforcement. A single entry cannot inform the reader of all there is to know about its subject matter because it is related to other entries. To know something about hostages, one has to be aware of

-vi-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Dictionary of Terrorism
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface and Acknowledgements vi
  • Introduction viii
  • Abbreviations and Acronyms xii
  • Glossary xviii
  • A 1
  • B 23
  • C 32
  • D 62
  • E 82
  • F 97
  • G 103
  • H 112
  • I 126
  • J 147
  • K 151
  • L 156
  • M 164
  • N 177
  • O 185
  • P 191
  • R 220
  • S 229
  • T 256
  • U 277
  • V 293
  • W 296
  • Z 304
  • Films and Documentaries 305
  • Terrorism - A Historical Timeline 309
  • Index 311
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 318

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.