Dictionary of Terrorism

By John Richard Thackrah | Go to book overview

I

India

In terms of terrorism and political violence in recent times in India, the world thinks of the Sikhs and their demands for an independent state, especially after the Golden Temple incident in June 1984 and the assassination of Mrs Gandhi in October that year. Nevertheless, there are other illegal movements, many of which are separatist, and mainly represent communities or are extreme left-wing. There is also a profusion of legally existing political parties, both at national and at state level. Divisions of existing parties, defections from these parties and formations of new parties have been frequent.

Hindu movements are well-established in origin. The All Assam People's Struggle Council was set up to oppose the inclusion of aliens, or Muslims who had fled from East Pakistan in 1971, when that territory seceded from Pakistan and became Bangladesh. Many atrocities have been committed against Bengalis and three massacres were reported in 1985. The All Assam Students Group actively campaigns against Bengali immigrants in Assam. On a broader scale many Hindus have been attracted by the paramilitary nature of the National Union of Selfless Servers. It is a communal group functioning as a secret society offshoot of the Hindu Jan Sangh sect that provoked street violence with Muslims. It is estimated to have up to ten million members. Less paramilitary but equally extremist is the left-wing Hindu group known as Ananda Marg. It wishes to establish global unity on the basis of a new social economic theory, and regularly uses suicide as a way of expression. It has been active in Australia against Indian diplomats. The political wing of this movement is the Universal Proutist Revolutionary Party. The word Proutist is derived from the 'progressive utility'' theory developed by one of its members, P. R. Sarkar.

The most well-known of the left-wing movements are the Naxalites who originated from an armed revolutionary campaign launched in North Bengal in 1965. This extreme faction of the Communist Party of India (Marxist-Leninist) was formed as a result of disagreements over operational strategy for the spread of communism in rural India. The Naxalites were committed to Maoist principles of people's liberation warfare. In the 1970s some members led by Satya Singh rejected revolutionary Marxism and support parliamentary democracy. Nevertheless, extremists continue to carry out attacks in over half of India's provinces, with membership numbers of around 15,000. The Naxalites support the upholding of both armed struggle and all other forms of struggle complementary to it. The other chief Left-wing movement is the Dalit Panthers, who appeared in the late 1960s as an organisation of young militant untouchables which took its inspiration from the Black Panthers in the USA. They have been active in encouraging conversions of Harijans to Islam, as a means of escaping from the caste system.

In addition to the Sikh and Kashmiri separatists, other separatist groups are active in other parts of India. In Manipur the People's Liberation Army is active. It is a Maoist organisation operating mainly in Manipur, but advocating independence from the whole north-eastern region of India. Support comes from tribes who have rejected

-126-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Dictionary of Terrorism
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface and Acknowledgements vi
  • Introduction viii
  • Abbreviations and Acronyms xii
  • Glossary xviii
  • A 1
  • B 23
  • C 32
  • D 62
  • E 82
  • F 97
  • G 103
  • H 112
  • I 126
  • J 147
  • K 151
  • L 156
  • M 164
  • N 177
  • O 185
  • P 191
  • R 220
  • S 229
  • T 256
  • U 277
  • V 293
  • W 296
  • Z 304
  • Films and Documentaries 305
  • Terrorism - A Historical Timeline 309
  • Index 311
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 318

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.