Dictionary of Terrorism

By John Richard Thackrah | Go to book overview

N

Narcissistic Terrorism

Narcissistic terrorists are loners with a deep sense of alienation, who harbour a grudge and have sought to wage war on society. Usually they have a political viewandsotheirownactsofviolenceare terroristic. The best example is Theodore Kaczynski the so-called Unabomber (Jane's, 1997).

See also: Millennial Violence; Technological Changes; Unabomber.


Reference
Jane's Terrorism: A Global Survey (1977), London: Jane's Information Group.

Narco-Terrorism

Narco-terrorism is a new and sinister aspect of the international terrorist phenomenon because its effects are insidious, persistent and more difficult to identify than are the sporadic, violent outbursts of the armed assailant.

The manufacture and delivery of narcotics is part of the terrorist portfolio for venous reasons. The most obvious is that drugs are a source of revenue to support the general activities of terrorist organisations. Another reason is that the use of drugs in target countries, such as the United States, is part of the terrorists' programme to undermine the integrity of their enemies. This is achieved by weakening the moral fibre of society by encouraging widespread addiction and by nurturing the socially enervating criminal activities that flourish around the drug trade. There is no lack of evidence of connections between the international narcotics trade and terrorist organisations. For example, the Palestine Liberation Organisation has been involved in over a hundred operations in the last decade involving drugs, and linking that organisation through Bulgaria, Cuba and Syria to drug traffic to the USA. Many of these examples include such organised crime networks as the effective distribution mechanisms, and also involve drugs-for-arms transactions.

Narco-terrorism in the USA has been uncovered during investigations of illegal immigration, organised crime, political corruption and Japan's penetration of the American car market. For some years the Sandinista guerrillas were involved in the international drug trade both before and after achieving power in Nicaragua.

The narco-terrorist, connected to drug traffic and employing the method of random killing of innocent bystanders, is a very special hybrid and the latest in a long line of terrorist groups. The Federal Government of the USA has known for quite some time about the narco-terrorist threat to the integrity of the state, but generally has been unable to control the spread of the problem.

The links between terrorist and insurgent groups and traffickers are most substantial in drug source countries, including Burma, Colombia, Peru, and Thailand. In Colombia, four major insurgent organisations work in collaboration with cocaine traffickers. In 1982 the Revolutionary Armed Force of Colombia (FARC) reportedly obtained over 3.8 million dollars per month by collecting protection

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Dictionary of Terrorism
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface and Acknowledgements vi
  • Introduction viii
  • Abbreviations and Acronyms xii
  • Glossary xviii
  • A 1
  • B 23
  • C 32
  • D 62
  • E 82
  • F 97
  • G 103
  • H 112
  • I 126
  • J 147
  • K 151
  • L 156
  • M 164
  • N 177
  • O 185
  • P 191
  • R 220
  • S 229
  • T 256
  • U 277
  • V 293
  • W 296
  • Z 304
  • Films and Documentaries 305
  • Terrorism - A Historical Timeline 309
  • Index 311
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